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In a previous answer I gave, I responded to the following warning being caused by the fact that '\u0B95' requires three bytes and so is a multicharacter literal:

warning: multi-character character constant [-Wmultichar]

But actually, I don't think I'm right and I don't think gcc is either. The standard states:

An ordinary character literal that contains more than one c-char is a multicharacter literal.

One production rule for c-char is a universal-character-name (i.e. \uXXXX or \UXXXXXXXX). Since \u0B95 is a single c-char, this is not a multicharacter literal. But now it gets messy. The standard also says:

An ordinary character literal that contains a single c-char has type char, with value equal to the numerical value of the encoding of the c-char in the execution character set.

So my literal has type char and value of the character in the execution character set (or implementation-defined value if it does not exist in that set). char is only defined to be large enough to store any member of the basic character set (which is not actually defined by the standard, but I assume it means the basic execution character set):

Objects declared as characters (char) shall be large enough to store any member of the implementation’s basic character set.

Therefore, since the execution character set is a superset of all the values a char can hold, my character may not fit in the char.

So what value does my char have? This doesn't seem to be defined anywhere. The standard does say that for char16_t literals, if the value is not representable, the program is ill-formed. It says nothing about ordinary literals, though.

So what's going on? Is this just a mess in the standard or am I missing something?

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with value equal to the numerical value of the encoding of the c-char in the execution character set Since no such mapping exists, I would read this as UB. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 25 '12 at 1:20
    
The mapping may exist depending on the implementation defined execution character set. –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 25 '12 at 1:23
    
A universal-character-name is translated to the encoding, in the appropriate execution character set, of the character named. If there is no such encoding, the universal-character-name is translated to an implementation defined encoding. (2.14.3.5) –  fefe Nov 25 '12 at 1:26
    
That's a separate issue. Assuming the character can be encoded in the execution character set, what is the value of the char literal or is it a multicharacter literal? If it can't, what if the implementation defined value can't be stored in a char? –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 25 '12 at 1:28

4 Answers 4

I would argue as follows:

The value of a character literal is implementation-defined if it falls outside of the implementation-defined range defined for char (for literals with no prefix)... (From section 2.14.3.4)

If '\u0B95' falls outside of the implementation-defined range defined for char (which it would if char is 8 bits), it's value is then implementation defined, at which point GCC can make its value a sequence of multiple c-chars, thus becoming a multicharacter literal.

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The paragraph is for numerical escape sequences and not universal character names though. You want the next paragraph! –  Luc Danton Nov 25 '12 at 9:10
    
@LucDanton I don't think this quote does only apply to numerical escape sequences. I think it just happens to be put in a silly paragraph. –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 25 '12 at 21:49
    
I also don't believe this applies to UCNs. Aside from the context, the discussion on the related committee defect reports does not suggest that this could apply to UCNs. –  bames53 Jul 24 at 22:43

Somebody posted an answer that correctly answered the second part of my question (what value will the char have?) but has since deleted their post. Since that part was correct, I'll reproduce it here together with my answer for the first part (is it a multicharacter literal?).


'\u0B95' is not a multicharacter literal and gcc is mistaken here. As stated in the question, a multicharacter literal is defined by (§2.14.3/1):

An ordinary character literal that contains more than one c-char is a multicharacter literal.

Since a universal-character-name is one expansion of a c-char, the literal '\u0B95' contains only one c-char. It would make sense if ordinary literals could not contain a universal-character-name for \u0B95 to be considered as six seperate characters (\, u, 0, etc.) but I cannot find this restriction anywhere. Therefore, it is a single character and the literal is not a multicharacter literal.

To further support this, why would it be considered to be multiple characters? At this point we haven't even given it an encoding so we don't know how many bytes it would take up. In UTF-16 it would take 2 bytes, in UTF-8 it would take 3 bytes and in some imagined encoding it could take just 1 byte.

So what value will the character literal have? First the universal-character-name is mapped to the corresponding encoding in the execution character set, unless it has not mapping in which case it has implementation-defined encoding (§2.14.3/5):

A universal-character-name is translated to the encoding, in the appropriate execution character set, of the character named. If there is no such encoding, the universal-character-name is translated to an implementation-defined encoding.

Either way, the char literal gets the value equal to the numerical value of the encoding (§2.14.3/1):

An ordinary character literal that contains a single c-char has type char, with value equal to the numerical value of the encoding of the c-char in the execution character set.

Now the important part, inconveniently tucked away in a different paragraph further in the section. If the value can not be represented in the char, it gets an implementation-defined value (§2.14.3/4):

The value of a character literal is implementation-defined if it falls outside of the implementation-defined range defined for char (for literals with no prefix) ...

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I've undeleted my answer. I deleted it because I didn't really want to leave a partial answer, as I only really target part of the question. –  Cornstalks Nov 25 '12 at 21:46
    
@Cornstalks Fair enough. I liked your answer when I read it but didn't have chance to respond until after you'd deleted it. –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 25 '12 at 21:48
    
"why would it be considered to be multiple characters?" GCC implemented UCNs this way deliberately in order to match the behavior of writing those characters literally in the source. The original behavior of writing such characters literally was not intentional as far as I know. –  bames53 Jul 24 at 22:32

You are correct, according to the spec '\u0B95' is a char-typed character literal with a value equal to the character's encoding in the execution character set. And you're right that the spec doesn't say anything about the case where this is not possible for char literals due to a single char being unable to represent that value. The behavior is undefined.

There are defect reports filed with the committee on this issue: E.g., http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_defects.html#912

The currently proposed resolution seems to be to specify that these character literals are also ints and have implementation defined values (although the proposed language isn't quite right for that), just like multichar literals. I'm not a fan of that solution, and I think a better solution is to say such literals are ill-formed.

This is what's implemented in clang: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/952ce7775dcf7472

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I think gcc supports multicharacter literals as a holdover from C where I think people used them instead of enums, etc. Probably that's what the committee is thinking too - backward compat. I'm thinking of adding a note to consider encoding prefix if the first two chars are '\\' and 'u' or 'U'. Also gcc warns by default. –  emsr Jul 25 at 17:57
    
@emsr Yeah, people still use multi-character literals, such as for FourCCs. GCC and clang both have the same 'implementation defined' behavior for multi-character literals. The difference is that GCC treats valid UTF-8 sequences in a literal as multiple c-chars in the C++ grammar, but clang properly recognizes them as a single c-char. –  bames53 Jul 25 at 20:08

Because you have no character encoding prefix gcc (and any other conformant compiler) will see '\u0B95' and think 1) char type and 2) multicharacter because there is more than one char code in the string.

  • u'\u0B95' is a UTF16 character.
  • u'\u0B95\u0B97' is a multicharacter UTF16 character.
  • U'\ufacebeef' is a UTF32 character.

etc.

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