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I'm a beginner with regular expressions and processing text. What I need to do is format the text in a file into CSV format to import into a spreadsheet.

I need to find a number with a certain range and insert a carriage return - \r - after it and remove a comma. I know how to find/replace for specific characters, but not in a range of characters or numbers.

This is the deal: I have a long text file, in this format.

Shimshon A
(blank)
November 24, 2012
13,481
jonathan t
Laguna Niguel, CA
November 24, 2012
13,480
scott b
Sussex, NJ
November 24, 2012
13,479

I've added end of line commas and beginning/end of line quote marks in a text editor with find/replace:

"Shimshon A",
"(blank)",
"November 24, 2012",
"13,481",
"jonathan t",
"Laguna Niguel, CA",
"November 24, 2012",
"13,480",
"scott b",
"Sussex, NJ",
"November 24, 2012",
"13,479",

But once after I remove all returns, I need to insert a return after the number in the range 13,481 to 1. That's because each column in the CSV needs to be Name, Location, Date and Number, like this:

"Shimshon A","(blank)","November 24, 2012","13,481"
"jonathan t","Laguna Niguel, CA","November 24, 2012","13,480"
"scott b","Sussex, NJ","November 24, 2012","13,479"
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Another way to approach this problem is to consider your dataset as groups of four lines

Using awk:

awk 'NR%4!=0 { printf "%s", $0; next } { sub(/,$/,"") }1' file

Results:

"Shimshon A","(blank)","November 24, 2012","13,481"
"jonathan t","Laguna Niguel, CA","November 24, 2012","13,480"
"scott b","Sussex, NJ","November 24, 2012","13,479"

Explanation:

As you can see, this uses the modulus operator to 'grep' every line that is not exactly divisible by four (i.e. not an integer). The 'printf' statement prints these lines alongside each other. 'next' skips when successful. At all other times the lagging comma is removed, and the line is printed (the 1 at the end of the statement is shorthand to print by default). Any question, please feel free to ask. HTH.

You could have also integrated the adding of commas and double quotes, by simply changing the printf statement:

awk 'NR%4!=0 { printf "\"%s\",", $0; next } { printf "\"%s\"\n", $0 }' file

Using GNU sed:

sed -n 'N;N;N;s/\n\|,$//g;p' file

Or prior to the addition of the commas and double quotes:

sed -n 'N;N;N;s/^\|$/"/g;s/\n/","/g;p' file

Results:

"Shimshon A","(blank)","November 24, 2012","13,481"
"jonathan t","Laguna Niguel, CA","November 24, 2012","13,480"
"scott b","Sussex, NJ","November 24, 2012","13,479"

Explanation:

Although this solution is much shorter, it has the same sentiment as described using awk, above. For the first sed statement: disable default printing with the -n flag. Append three lines to pattern space. On the fourth line, remove newline characters and lagging commas. Then print.

The second sed statement is much the same; append three lines to pattern space. On the fourth line, replace the start and ends of the line with double quotes. Also replace newline characters with double quote, comma, double quote; globally. Then print. HTH.


From the comments:

From my experience sorting using awk (although possible) can become difficult to read rather quickly. Here's a way that lets you re-use some of the previous code we've written using two other tools, paste and sort:

paste <(awk -F, 'NR%4==2 { print $NF }' file) <(awk 'NR%4!=0 { printf "\"%s\",", $0; next } { printf "\"%s\"\n", $0 }' file) | sort | sed 's/[^"]*//'

It should be noted that this command uses input prior to the addition of commas and double quotes -- As you can see it uses the second awk command described above. It works by pasting (with paste) the 'state' ahead of each of the results we obtained earlier. This then allows the line to be alphabetically sorted using sort. Once the input has been sorted, sed is used to strip off this info.

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Finished editing. Hopefully not too many typos. Comments welcome. –  Steve Nov 25 '12 at 3:51
    
Also, see this link - you may find it insightful: stackoverflow.com/questions/13550072/… –  Steve Nov 25 '12 at 11:30
    
Thanks for all the work; I'm learning from the examples. The awk examples work fine, and I figured out how to read from one file and output to another file, i.e. file.txt > newfile.txt. The sed examples don't want to work; the first doesn't change the text (on standard output) and the second, while it processes everything, for some reason it strips the first and last quote marks on each line. Might be the sed I'm using on OS X; it seems to be POSIX sed and not GNU sed. But, awk works fine, and thats fine with me. Thanks. –  songdogtech Nov 25 '12 at 18:40
    
And now I realize that I need to split one of the lines - the city and state line - into two lines in order to be able to sort on the state. Let me see if I can figure that out, using the line counting technique. It's every four lines, but offset by 1 at the beginning. Some of those lines are (blank), while others are half blank, i.e. ` , AZ` –  songdogtech Nov 25 '12 at 18:46
    
@songdogtech: Yes you're right. I should have mentioned that the sed commands are GNU only, unfortunately. I've also updated my answer to help you sort the lines by 'state'. HTH. –  Steve Nov 25 '12 at 23:22
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