Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have only been doing this for 3 months and currently at a stand still. I am not sure what I'm doing wrong. I would appreciate any help pointing me in the right direction. I am not asking for anyone to do my homework for me. I am supposed to write a program to accept from the user one line of input and then count and output the number of lowercase letters. This is what I have so far but it doesn't do what it is supposed to do.

#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <cctype>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main(){
    char text;
    int count = 0;
    cout << " Enter one line of text: ";

    do 
    {
        cin.get(text);

        while(text!='\n')
        {
            if(islower(text))
            count++;
        }
    } while(text!='\n');

    cout << count << "\n";
}
share|improve this question
    
So what does it do? Seems to me like it would be stuck in an infinite loop...? –  MadSkunk Nov 25 '12 at 1:48

2 Answers 2

The problem was with the input: you input distinct characters, but whitespace would be skipped.

You can use std::getline to get a line of input at once:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <cctype>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << " Enter one line of text: ";
    string s;
    if(getline(cin, s))
    {
        size_t count = count_if(s.begin(), s.end(), 
               [](unsigned char ch) { return islower(ch); });
        cout << count << "\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looks somewhat like my answer to an earlier instance of the question except that my answer didn't use std::string and got the call to islower() right while your call is wrong: if char is signed, you will create undefined behavior because the int argument to islower() needs to be positive. That is, you need to convert the char to unsigned char and get this promoted to int. The easiest way to do this in your code is to defined the lambda to take an unsigned char. Misuse of <cctype> functions is one of my pet peeves. –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 25 '12 at 2:00
    
size_t is the type used for the result of sizeof() expressions, i.e., count is declared to be of an unsigned integral type. Its value is initialized with the result of the std::count_if() algorithm. The algorithm is called with the sequence of characters starting at s.begin() and ending at, but not including, s.end(). That is, the algorithm is called with the sequence of characters in s. The last argument to std::count_of() is a lambda-expression implementing a test calling islower(). sehe could have used static_cast<int(*)(int)>(std::islower) instead. –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 25 '12 at 2:19
    
Of course, sehe probably meant to use [](unsigned char c) { return islower(c); } to cast the char to an unsigned char to correctly call islower(). A lambda-expression starts with a capture (in this case the []) listing how referenced variables are treated (in this case, there is no variable referenced). Next comes a function argument list (which is optional but present in this case). Since there is just one return statement the return type can be deduced and is omitted. Finally there is a function body. This works only with C++ 2011, though. –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 25 '12 at 2:22
    
@sehe : I have not been introduced to <algorithm> yet. Is there anyway you could dumb this down for me? I'm having trouble understanding at size_t count. –  Aaron Nov 25 '12 at 2:24
    
@Aaron I don't think there is a need for you to understand that. You needed to understand the bits about getline and the explanation that I gave about that :) –  sehe Nov 25 '12 at 2:36

You create an infinite loop:

while (text != '\n') {
    ...
}

will continue forever if text (somewhat of a misnomer for a character) ever happens to be something different than '\n'. As a general guideline, whenever you create a loop you need to verify that the body of the loop somehow makes progress towards the end of the loop and that the end of the loop is reached (unless, of course, you intend to create an infinite lop) You probably just want to get rid of this while (...) and just keep the body.

Note that the outer loop should have two conditions to terminate:

  1. It should terminate if you reach the end of a line.
  2. It should terminate if you reach the end of the input: This isn't necessarily terminated by a newline.

If I were to write the loop it would look something like this:

for (std::istreambuf_iterator<char> it(std::cin), end; it != end && *it != '\n'; ++it) {
    // do something with the `char` obtained from `*it`
}

It is also worth noting that you need to make sure that a positive value is passed to islower() (or any of the other functions from <cctype>): There are systems where char is signed and, e.g., the ü in my name would convert into a negative value, causing undefined behavior when calling islower('ü'). The way to avoid this problem is to convert the char into an unsigned char before passing it to the <cctype> functions: the bit pattern of static_cast<unsigned char>(c) is identical to the bit pattern of c (assuming that c is of type char).

Sticking with the original approach of a while-loop reading a char, the basic loop would look something like this:

while (std::cin.get(text) && text != '\n') {
    if (std::islower(std::static_cast<unsigned char>(text))) {
        ++count;
    }
}

In general, I have found that do ... while-loops rarely don't survive into production code and this isn't an exception: You only want to enter the loop if the char could successfully be read. Since a newline won't be a lower case letter, it can be put into the condition directly as well. For ASCII character std::islower(text) would work but to make the code solid, I have added a cast to unsigned char to make sure things won't break. Finally, the C++ idiom to increment variables is, ironically, preincrement, i.e. ++count rather than count++. The primary use is that preincrement is more efficient if the type to which it is applied is not entirely trivial. Since C++ uses lots of iterators which are incremented, it is conventional to use preincrement.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a very complete answer –  sehe Nov 25 '12 at 2:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.