Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the mysql I need to achieve the result below given these 2 tables:

table1:

+----+-------+
| id | name  |
+----+-------+
|  1 | alan  |
|  2 | bob   |
|  3 | dave  |
+----+-------+

table2:

+----+---------+
| id | state   |
+----+---------+
|  2 | MI      |
|  3 | WV      |
|  4 | FL      |
+----+---------+

I want to create a temporary view that looks like this

desired result:

+----+---------+---------+
| id | name    | state   |
+----+---------+---------+
|  1 | alan    |         |
|  2 | bob     | MI      |
|  3 | dave    | WV      |
|  4 |         | FL      |
+----+---------+---------+

I tried a mysql union but the following result is not what I want.

create view table3 as
(select id,name,"" as state from table1)
union
(select id,"" as name,state from table2)

table3 union result:

+----+---------+---------+
| id | name    | state   |
+----+---------+---------+
|  1 | alan    |         |
|  2 | bob     |         |
|  3 | dave    |         |
|  2 |         | MI      |
|  3 |         | WV      |
|  4 |         | FL      |
+----+---------+---------+
share|improve this question
    
Very good demonstration and definition of the problem +1 –  sємsєм Nov 25 '12 at 1:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You need to use an SQL operator called JOIN to get what you want.

JOIN is a fundamental part of the SQL language, as much as a while loop is for other programming languages.

Start here: A Visual Explanation of SQL Joins

Another way of thinking of JOIN vs. UNION is:

  • UNION appends rows together.
  • JOIN appends columns together.

For example:

SELECT * 
FROM table1
JOIN table2 USING (id);

This is a style of join that returns only the rows for which a matching id exists in both tables. But you want all of those id's for which a row exists in at least one table or the other.

SELECT * 
FROM table1
LEFT OUTER JOIN table2 USING (id);

This gets all the rows from table1, with their matching rows in table2. But to get the reverse, we'd need:

SELECT * 
FROM table1
RIGHT OUTER JOIN table2 USING (id);

SQL also defines a FULL OUTER JOIN which would do both at once, but unfortunately MySQL hasn't implemented that part of the SQL standard. But we can use UNION to combine the two types of joins. Union will eliminate duplicate rows by default.

update: I troubleshot this, and got it to work. It turns out you have to name the columns explicitly, to make sure they are in the same columns in both of the unioned queries. Here's the query that works, copied from my terminal window:

SELECT id, name, state
FROM table1
LEFT OUTER JOIN table2 USING (id)
UNION
SELECT id, name, state
FROM table1
RIGHT OUTER JOIN table2 USING (id);

It's a good habit in general to avoid using SELECT *, and this is just one more case where it's a good idea.

Also, I had left a superfluous semicolon in the query example before. That was just a typo on my part.

This query produces the following output, copied from my terminal window:

+----+------+-------+
| id | name | state |
+----+------+-------+
|  1 | alan | NULL  |
|  2 | bob  | MI    |
|  3 | dave | WV    |
|  4 | NULL | FL    |
+----+------+-------+

PS: Thank you for asking the question so clearly!

share|improve this answer
    
the result seems close, but not the desired result mentions above. The formatting is not supported the same in this comment so I pasted the result in the question. –  panofish Nov 25 '12 at 2:27
    
@panofish SELECT * FROM table1 LEFT JOIN table2 ON (table1.id = table2.id) UNION SELECT * FROM table1 RIGHT JOIN table2 ON (table1.id = table2.id) is basically the same as what BillKarwin states but achieves slightly different results.. may be more what you're needing. –  pebbl Nov 25 '12 at 2:36
    
closer but still doesnt produce the desired table... perhaps this is an example that can only be done programmatically? –  panofish Nov 25 '12 at 21:48
    
See above update, I got it to work. –  Bill Karwin Nov 25 '12 at 23:01
    
Thanks Bill... the update worked. Interesting that you must name the columns explicity. –  panofish Nov 26 '12 at 19:12

You need FULL OUTER JOIN:

SELECT coalesce(a.id, b.id), a.name, b.state
FROM table1 a
FULL OUTER JOIN table2 b ON (a.id = b.id)
share|improve this answer
2  
MySQL doesn't support FULL OUTER JOIN –  Michael Berkowski Nov 25 '12 at 2:02
    
yup... full outer join didn't work in mysql –  panofish Nov 25 '12 at 2:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.