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I'm trying to find a way to get the index number when parsing a xml file with minidom. xml will look something like this

<stuff>
    <morestuff>
        <sometag>catagory1</sometag>
        <path pathversion="1">/path Im looking to for</path> #<--info i'm after
        <path pathversion="2">/path I don't need</path>
        <path pathversion="3">/path I don't need</path>
    </morestuff>
    <morestuff>
        <sometag>catagory2</sometag>
        <path pathversion="1">/other path I'm looking for</path> #<--info i'm after
        <path pathversion="2">/path I don't need</path>
        <path pathversion="3">/path I don't need</path>
    </morestuff>
</stuff>

I want to do something like this

for element in node.getElementsByTagName('sometag'):
    if element.firstChild.data == 'catagory1':
        elementid = element.indexnumber #<----how do I write the [0], or [1] to a variable so I can use it to discribe the position in the next line
        var1 = node.getElementsByTagName('path')[elementid].firstChild.data
    if element.firstChild.data == 'catagory2':
        elementid = element.indexnumber
        var2 = node.getElementsByTagName('path')[elementid].firstChild.data
share|improve this question
    
I would suggest using elementtree or lxml instead of minidom. See wiki.python.org/moin/MiniDom –  Keith Nov 25 '12 at 4:56
    
It's not clear what index you're trying to get. Can you give a sample of the desired output? You want the index of <morestuff> element among its siblings? –  LarsH Nov 25 '12 at 5:10
    
I'm trying to get the <path pathversion="1"> for both items under <sometag> catigory 1 and catigory 2. The tricky part thats getting me is I need to know which category they came from and the categorys might not be in that order. –  otkaz Nov 25 '12 at 7:08
    
@Keith Thanks for the suggestion of elementtree looks like I can grab the index using it as found here stackoverflow.com/questions/3763048/… I'll see if I can rework this with elementtree. –  otkaz Nov 25 '12 at 7:09

2 Answers 2

This will create a dictionary containing the information you wanted:

import xml.dom.minidom
doc = xml.dom.minidom.parseString(test)

paths = {}

for element in doc.getElementsByTagName('morestuff'):
    # get the text value of the sometag tag
    category = element.getElementsByTagName('sometag')[0].firstChild.nodeValue

    # get all the paths which are children of the morestuff element
    for path in element.getElementsByTagName('path'):
        if path.getAttribute('pathversion') == '1':
            pathstr = path.firstChild.nodeValue
            paths[category] = pathstr

print paths

The output I get is:

{u'catagory1': u'/path Im looking to for', u'catagory2': u"/other path I'm looking for"}
share|improve this answer

How about using etree as Keith suggests :-

['/path Im looking to for', "/other path I'm looking for"]

using this code :-

import xml.etree.ElementTree as ET
tree = ET.fromstring('''<stuff>
    <morestuff>
        <sometag>catagory1</sometag>
        <path pathversion="1">/path Im looking to for</path>
        <path pathversion="2">/path I don't need</path>
        <path pathversion="3">/path I don't need</path>
    </morestuff>
    <morestuff>
        <sometag>catagory2</sometag>
        <path pathversion="1">/other path I'm looking for</path>
        <path pathversion="2">/path I don't need</path>
        <path pathversion="3">/path I don't need</path>
    </morestuff>
</stuff>
''')
print [e.text for e in tree.findall('.//morestuff/path[@pathversion="1"]')]
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