Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
typedef struct Edge
{
    int v1, v2, w;
    bool operator <(const Edge &rhs) const{
        bool b = v1 < rhs.v1 || v2 < rhs.v2;
        return (b);
    }
} edge;


template <class T>
struct my_less
{
    bool operator()(const T& _Left, const T& _Right) const
    {
        return (_Left < _Right);
    }
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    set <edge, my_less<edge> > F;

    edge e3 = { 3, 3, 3};
    edge e4 = { 3, 7, 3};
    edge e5 = { 2, 7, 3};

    F.insert(e3);
    printf("e3 ? %d\n", F.find(e3)!=F.end()); // O
    printf("e4 ? %d\n", F.find(e4)!=F.end()); // O
    printf("e5 ? %d\n", F.find(e5)!=F.end()); // X

    //printf("%d\n", e3<e4);

    return 0;
}
If run this code, I got an error at "F.find(e5)!=F.end()" with following message.
"Debug Assertion Failed!. Expression: invalid operator < "

The condition of two edges of '(x,y), (p,q)' equality is 
 !(x < p || y < q) && !(p < x || q < y)

It can be '(x>=p && y>=q) && (p>=x && q>=y)'

I really don't know why assertion raised.
Is there something wrong?
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your comparison doesn't enforce a strict ordering. For example:

Edge e1;
Edge e2;

e1.v1 = 5;
e1.v2 = 4;

e2.v1 = 4;
e2.v2 = 5;

// e1 < e2 is true
// e2 < e1 is true
// So which one should we really trust? Neither, let's abort the program!

You need to make your < operator actually work like < should. If e1 < e2 is true, then e2 < e1 needs to be false.

I think this might be what you want, but beware that I haven't tested it:

return v1 < rhs.v1 || (v1 == rhs.v1 && v2 < rhs.v2);

This should, in theory, sort by v1, and use v2 to break ties.

share|improve this answer
2  
The easy way to write a correct operator< is to follow this pattern: if (a != rhs.a) return a<rhs.a; if (b != rhs.b) return b<rhs.b; /*etc*/; return false; –  Yakk Nov 25 '12 at 5:31
    
Another, easier, way to write a correct operator< is to follow this pattern: return std::tie(e1.v1, e1.v2) < std::tie(e2.v1, e2.v2); –  Robᵩ Nov 25 '12 at 10:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.