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This is the instruction in one of the exercises in our Java class. Before anything else, I would like to say that I 'do my homework' and I'm not just being lazy asking someone on Stack Overflow to answer this for me. This specific item has been my problem out of all the other exercises because I've been struggling to find the 'perfect algorithm' for this.

*Write JAVA program that will input 10 integer values and display either in ascending or descending order. Note: Arrays.sort() is not allowed.

This is the code I have come up with, it works but it has one obvious flaw. If i enter the same value twice or more, for example 5, 5, 5, 4, 6, 7, 3, 2, 8, 10. Only one of the three 5s entered would be counted and included in the output. The output I get (for the ascending order) is : 2 3 4 5 0 0 6 7 8 10.

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Exer3AscDesc
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
        int tenNums[]=new int[10], orderedNums[]=new int[10];
        int greater;
        String choice;

        //get input
        System.out.println("Enter 10 integers : ");
        for (int i=0;i<tenNums.length;i++)
        {
            System.out.print(i+1+"=> ");
            tenNums[i] = scan.nextInt();
        }
        System.out.println();

        //imperfect number ordering algorithm
        for(int indexL=0;indexL<tenNums.length;indexL++)
        {
            greater=0;
            for(int indexR=0;indexR<tenNums.length;indexR++)
            {
                if(tenNums[indexL]>tenNums[indexR])
                {
                    greater++;
                }
            }
            orderedNums[greater]=tenNums[indexL];
        }

        //ask if ascending or descending
        System.out.print("Display order :\nA - Ascending\nD - Descending\nEnter your choice : ");
        choice = scan.next();

        //output the numbers based on choice
        if(choice.equalsIgnoreCase("a"))
        {
            for(greater=0;greater<orderedNums.length;greater++)
            {
                System.out.print(orderedNums[greater]+" ");
            }
        }
        else if(choice.equalsIgnoreCase("d"))
        {
            for(greater=9;greater>-1;greater--)
            {
                System.out.print(orderedNums[greater]+" ");
            }
        }
    }
}
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You could use PriorityQueue, although your teacher might not appreciate that. –  msell Nov 25 '12 at 6:21
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can find so many different sorting algorithms in internet, but if you want to fix your own solution you can do following changes in your code:

instead of:

 orderedNums[greater]=tenNums[indexL];

you need to do this:

        while (orderedNums[greater] == tenNums[indexL]) greater++;
        orderedNums[greater]=tenNums[indexL];

this code basically, checks if that particular index is occupied by a similar number, then it will try to find next free index.

NOTE: Since the default value in your sorted array elements is 0, you need to make sure 0 is not in your list. otherwise you need to initiate your sorted array with an especial number that you sure is not in your list e.g: Integer.MAX_VALUE

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Thanks a lot mohammad, I spent too much time trying to formulate different algorithms, I didn't realize how simple it was that I just needed to add that one line to my code. –  ransan32 Nov 25 '12 at 15:53
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I would recommend looking at selection sort: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selection_sort or insertion sort: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insertion_sort if you aren't too worried about performance. Maybe that will give you some ideas.

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Here is one simple solution

public static void main(String[] args) {        
        //Without using Arrays.sort function
        int i;
        int nos[] = {12,9,-4,-1,3,10,34,12,11};
        System.out.print("Values before sorting: \n");
        for(i = 0; i < nos.length; i++)
            System.out.println( nos[i]+"  ");               
        sort(nos, nos.length);
        System.out.print("Values after sorting: \n");       
        for(i = 0; i <nos.length; i++){
            System.out.println(nos[i]+"  ");
        }
    }

    private static void sort(int nos[], int n) {
     for (int i = 1; i < n; i++){
          int j = i;
          int B = nos[i];
          while ((j > 0) && (nos[j-1] > B)){
            nos[j] = nos[j-1];
            j--;
          }
          nos[j] = B;
        }
    }

And the output is:

Values before sorting:

12
9
-4
-1
3
10
34
12
11

Values after sorting:

-4
-1
3
9
10
11
12
12
34

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