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Is there any way to guarantee you access only blocks that map to the same set in an n-way set associative cache if you don't know the level of associativity nor the size of the cache itself? I know that given either level of associativity or cache size it's possible to do this, but in this particular situation all I've got is a low-balled estimate of the cache size. I've thought about it for a while and I'm starting to believe it's not possible, but I'm not definitively sure.

For the sake of this question please assume that it's impossible to obtain the level of associativity or the cache size by any means.

The reason for this is that I'm trying to quantitatively determine the level of associativity, but the algorithm I used to quantitatively determine cache size only gives exact results for cache sizes that are a power of two and it gives the nearest power of two estimate otherwise. Unfortunately the machine I'm currently running on has a 3MB L2 cache.

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After doing more research and asking a professor of computer architecture, it would seem there is no foolproof way to guarantee you will only access blocks that map to the same set if you don't know cache size or the associativity of the cache.

Given the cache size, N, you can access elements of an array that are separated by N bytes or any multiple of N bytes and each of the blocks that are subsequently pulled in will be mapped to the same set. This is the easiest way to guarantee you access only blocks that map to the same set.

If you do not know the cache size, the best you can do is estimate. For example, if you access elements of an array that are separated by 32MB then you are guaranteed to access only blocks that map to the same set for any cache size that is a power of two up to 32MB. Caches with odd sizes will not have this same guarantee.

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