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From section (6.2.2/7) C99 Standard

7. If, within a translation unit, the same identifier appears with both internal and external linkage, the behavior is undefined.

While the following generates a compile time error due to conflict of definitions

// 'x' has external linkage
extern int x;

// Here, 'x' has internal linkage
static int x;

But the following compiles fine,

// 'x' has external linkage
extern int x;

void foo() {
  // Here, 'x' has internal linkage
  static int x;
}

Do both the cases invoke an undefined behavior?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your question stems from an incorrect assumption that a locally declared static variable has internal linkage. In reality a static variable declared in a block scope has no linkage. See 6.2.2/6

6 The following identifiers have no linkage: an identifier declared to be anything other than an object or a function; an identifier declared to be a function parameter; a block scope identifier for an object declared without the storage-class specifier extern.

Only file-scope declaration can have external or internal linkage (plus local extern declarations).

Therefore 6.2.2/7 and your question simply do not apply.

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Thanks for pointing that out. I guess that's what happens when you copy and paste stuff around :S –  user963241 Nov 25 '12 at 6:38

As far as I know, it doesn't, since the two variables aren't the same. The local variable takes priority over the global one, and in the scope of foo(), it's declared only once. See the assembler output - the compiler will most likely translate the two variables into two different symbols.

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