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Can anybody explain why this code throws OOME when I run it from Eclipse (Juno) but works fine when I run it from command line? I use -Xmx256M in both cases.

static class Task implements Runnable {
    byte[] buf = new byte[150000000];
    @Override
    public void run() {
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    System.out.println(Runtime.getRuntime().maxMemory());
    ExecutorService ex = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
    ex.submit(new Task()).get();
    ex.submit(new Task()).get();
}

Here is the Eclipse output

259522560
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space
    at Test2$Task.<init>(Test2.java:7)
    at Test2.main(Test2.java:17)

I ran it on my notebook, cannot be sure how it behaves on other PCs.

share|improve this question
    
Do you know where exactly the exception is happening? before second submit or after? did you consider using ex.shutDown() after second submit ? – mhshams Nov 25 '12 at 7:46
    
exception is trown on second submit, it is line line 17 in original code, so it doesn't make sense to try to add anything after second submit – Evgeniy Dorofeev Nov 25 '12 at 8:15
    
If you put a sleep in your task's run do you get an OOME in Eclipse as well? My guess is that when run from the command line the first task has been executed and therefore can be garbage collected by the time the second is submitted. Unless I'm doing my maths wrongly you should be getting an OOME if two objects of your task exist at once. – Martin Wilson Nov 25 '12 at 8:32
    
@Martin, get() method in the first task, will wait until the task finished. so when we submitting the second task, the first one definitely is finished. – mhshams Nov 25 '12 at 8:37
    
The task object may still be referenced though, I guess (even if it has finished running) although it's hard to see where. – Martin Wilson Nov 25 '12 at 8:47

-- original response -- Eclipse is running with 256M, but did you edit the run config of the app to give the launched application 256aM as well? If not, it will run with default heap.

-- update after question updated --

I tested the code below, and it runs fine in eclipse and outside.

Does the OOME happen at the first run (eg, what does the following output?), and does changing the position of allocation affect things?:

public class Test {
    public static class Task implements Runnable {
        byte[] buf;
        int id;
        public Task(int i) {
            id = i;
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            buf = new byte[150000000];
            System.out.println("hi " + id);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        System.out.println(Runtime.getRuntime().maxMemory());
        ExecutorService ex = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
        ex.submit(new Task(1)).get();
        ex.submit(new Task(2)).get();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
sure: java -Xmx256M Test – Evgeniy Dorofeev Nov 25 '12 at 6:29
1  
I meant did you go to run > run configurations, select launch shortcut, arguments tag, and in the VM args box type in -Xmx256M? – Sajid Nov 25 '12 at 6:40
1  
I think the question is- are you setting this for your java app or the Eclipse IDE itself? Where are you setting this? How about adding a debug statement to log how much heap is available to confirm? – Martin Wilson Nov 25 '12 at 6:41
    
Martin is correct. I am suggesting that the solution is to correctly configure the run shortcut in Eclipse to give enough stack. From the author comment, it sounds like that it wasn't the case. – Sajid Nov 25 '12 at 6:54
    
Right, corrected my question, please take a look – Evgeniy Dorofeev Nov 25 '12 at 7:05

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