Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using fft2 to compute the Fourier Transform of a grayscale image in MATLAB.

What is the common way to plot the magnitude of the result?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Assuming that I is your input image and F is its Fourier Transform (i.e. F = fft2(I))

You can use this code:

F = fftshift(F); % Center FFT

F = abs(F); % Get the magnitude
F = log(F+1); % Use log, for perceptual scaling, and +1 since log(0) is undefined
F = mat2gray(F); % Use mat2gray to scale the image between 0 and 1

imshow(F,[]); % Display the result
share|improve this answer
3  
+1. You might add a comment on why you are using the log(F+1) and not log(F) - (Due to log(0) non-defined value) –  Andrey Nov 25 '12 at 8:18
    
@Andery Thanks, done. –  Ben-Uri Nov 25 '12 at 9:24

Here is an example from my HOW TO Matlab page:

close all; clear all;

img   = imread('lena.tif','tif');
imagesc(img)
img   = fftshift(img(:,:,2));
F     = fft2(img);

figure;

imagesc(100*log(1+abs(fftshift(F)))); colormap(gray); 
title('magnitude spectrum');

figure;
imagesc(angle(F));  colormap(gray);
title('phase spectrum');

This gives the magnitude spectrum and phase spectrum of the image. I used a color image, but you can easily adjust it to use gray image as well.

ps. I just noticed that on Matlab 2012a the above image is no longer included. So, just replace the first line above with say

img = imread('ngc6543a.jpg');

and it will work. I used an older version of Matlab to make the above example and just copied it here.

On the scaling factor

When we plot the 2D Fourier transform magnitude, we need to scale the pixel values using log transform to expand the range of the dark pixels into the bright region so we can better see the transform. We use a c value in the equation

s = c log(1+r) 

There is no known way to pre detrmine this scale that I know. Just need to try different values to get on you like. I used 100 in the above example.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

protected by Shai Nov 3 '13 at 6:25

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.