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I want to parse a string like "3.5" to a double. However,

double.Parse("3.5") 

yields 35 and

double.Parse("3.5", System.Globalization.NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint) 

throws a FormatException.

Now my computer's locale is set to German, wherein a comma is used as decimal separator. It might have to do something with that and double.Parse() expecting "3,5" as input, but I'm not sure.

How can I parse a string containing a decimal number that may or may not be formatted as specified in my current locale?

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The decimal comma will certainly be affecting the output. –  ChrisF Aug 30 '09 at 21:19
4  
Don't forget about the double.TryParse() method, if it's appropriate for your situation. –  Kyle Gagnet Aug 30 '09 at 21:24

8 Answers 8

double.Parse("3.5", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)
share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it by a few seconds –  ChrisF Aug 30 '09 at 21:18
1  
Well, XmlConvert is not really intended to be used to parse a single double value in code. I prefer to use double.Parse or Convert.ToDouble that make my intention obvious. –  Mehrdad Afshari Aug 30 '09 at 21:29
1  
This means doulble.Parse uses the default culture which may not contain dot as a decimal point?? –  Ahmed Said Aug 30 '09 at 22:32
1  
It uses the current culture of the thread it's running on. –  Mehrdad Afshari Aug 30 '09 at 22:40
1  
if converting 12345678.12345678, it converts too 12345678.123457 –  jaminator Dec 2 '11 at 16:18

I usualy use a multi-culture function to parse user input, mostly because if someone is used to the numpad and is using a culture that use a comma as the decimal separator, that person will use the point of the numpad instead of a comma.

public static double GetDouble(string value, double defaultValue)
{
    double result;

    //Try parsing in the current culture
    if (!double.TryParse(value, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, out result) &&
        //Then try in US english
        !double.TryParse(value, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en-US"), out result) &&
        //Then in neutral language
        !double.TryParse(value, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.Any, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, out result))
    {
        result = defaultValue;
    }

    return result;
}

Beware though, @nikie comments are true. To my defense, I use this function in a controlled environment where I know that the culture can either be en-US, en-CA or fr-CA. I use this function because in French, we use the comma as a decimal separator, but anybody who ever worked in finance will always use the decimal separator on the numpad, but this is a point, not a comma. So even in the fr-CA culture, I need to parse number that will have a point as the decimal separator.

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10  
I'm not sure that's a good idea. You can't reliably parse a double if you don't know the culture: In Germany, double values may contain '.'s, but they're considered to be thousands-separators there. So in Legate's case, GetDouble("3.5") would return 35 in a German locale and 3.5 in a en-us environment. –  nikie Oct 15 '09 at 13:58
    
No, Pierre Alain is right, as it's exactly as written. If your culture says "dot is a thousand" separator, then "3.5" is seen as "35" and it's good. However if you culture as no rules for the "dot", then the character is parsed as a decimal point, and it also works. I would have avoided trying the enUS culture, but it's a personal choice. –  xryl669 Apr 10 '13 at 15:33

The trick is to use invariant culture, to parse dot in all cultures.

double.Parse("3.5", System.Globalization.NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint, System.Globalization.NumberFormatInfo.InvariantInfo);
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2  
Does not work in all scenarios. 1.234.567,89 –  JanW Aug 20 '10 at 21:23
string testString1 = "2,457";
string testString2 = "2.457";    
double testNum = 0.5;
char decimalSepparator;
decimalSepparator = testNum.ToString()[1];

Console.WriteLine(double.Parse(testString1.Replace('.', decimalSepparator).Replace(',', decimalSepparator)));
Console.WriteLine(double.Parse(testString2.Replace('.', decimalSepparator).Replace(',', decimalSepparator)));
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work for countries that use a thousand separator. –  noggin182 Feb 18 at 16:03

This does the job in any scenario. Its a little bit parsing.

List<string> inputs = new List<string>()
{
    "1.234.567,89",
    "1 234 567,89",
    "1 234 567.89",
    "1,234,567.89",
    "123456789",
    "1234567,89",
    "1234567.89",
};
string output;

foreach (string input in inputs)
{
    // unify string (no spaces, only . )
    output = input.Trim().Replace(" ", "").Replace(",", ".");

    // split it on points
    string[] split = output.Split('.');

    if (split.Count() > 1)
    {
        // take all parts except last
        output = string.Join("", split.Take(split.Count()-1).ToArray());

        // combine token parts with last part
        output = string.Format("{0}.{1}", output, split.Last());
    }

    // parse double invariant
    double d = double.Parse(output, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    Console.WriteLine(d);
}
share|improve this answer
    
1.234.567.890 would return 1234567.890 –  Dan Vogel Aug 23 '11 at 17:39
    
I haven't tried, but if you execute the app in different culture SOs, this code wouldn't make the trick, I think :/ –  Dani bISHOP May 30 '12 at 15:59

I think 100% correct conversion isn't possible, if the value comes from a user input. e.g. if the value is 123.456, it can be a grouping or it can be a decimal point. If you really need 100% you have to describe your format and throw an exception if it is not correct.

But I improved the code of JanW, so we get a little bit more ahead to the 100%. The idea behind is, that if the last seperator is a groupSeperator, this would be more a integer type, than a double.

The added code is in the first if of GetDouble.

void Main()
{
    List<string> inputs = new List<string>() {     
        "1.234.567,89",     
        "1 234 567,89",     
        "1 234 567.89",     
        "1,234,567.89",    
        "1234567,89",     
        "1234567.89",  
        "123456789",   
        "123.456.789", 
        "123,456,789,"
    }; 

    foreach(string input in inputs) {
        Console.WriteLine(GetDouble(input,0d));
    }

}

public static double GetDouble(string value, double defaultValue) {
    double result;
    string output;

    // check if last seperator==groupSeperator
    string groupSep = System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.NumberGroupSeparator;
    if (value.LastIndexOf(groupSep) + 4 == value.Count())
    {
        bool tryParse = double.TryParse(value, System.Globalization.NumberStyles.Any, System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, out result);
        result = tryParse ? result : defaultValue;
    } 
    else 
    {
        // unify string (no spaces, only . )     
        output = value.Trim().Replace(" ", string.Empty).Replace(",", ".");      

        // split it on points     
        string[] split = output.Split('.');      

        if (split.Count() > 1)     
        {         
            // take all parts except last         
            output = string.Join(string.Empty, split.Take(split.Count()-1).ToArray()); 

            // combine token parts with last part         
            output = string.Format("{0}.{1}", output, split.Last());     
        }      
        // parse double invariant     
        result = double.Parse(output, System.Globalization.CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);             
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

I improved the code of @JanW as well...

I need it to format results from medical instruments, they send also ">1000", "23.3e02", "350E-02", "NEGATIVE"

private string FormatResult(string vResult)
{
  string output;
  string input = vResult;

  // unify string (no spaces, only . ) 
  output = input.Trim().Replace(" ", "").Replace(",", ".");

  // split it on points 
  string[] split = output.Split('.');

  if (split.Count() > 1)
  {
    // take all parts except last 
    output = string.Join("", split.Take(split.Count() - 1).ToArray());

    // combine token parts with last part 
    output = string.Format("{0}.{1}", output, split.Last());
  }
  string sfirst = output.Substring(0, 1);

  try
  {
    if (sfirst == "<" || sfirst == ">")
    {
      output = output.Replace(sfirst, "");
      double res = Double.Parse(output);
      return String.Format("{1}{0:0.####}", res, sfirst);
    }
    else
    {
      double res = Double.Parse(output);
      return String.Format("{0:0.####}", res);
    }
  }
  catch
  {
    return output;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
Double.Parse("3,5".Replace(',', '.'), CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)

Replace the comma with a point before parsing. Useful in countries with a comma as decimal separator. Think about limiting user input (if necessary) to one comma or point.

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Much more correct answer than the one that have +133 votes... It allows to live on both systems with "," or "." decimal separator... –  Badiboy Jun 11 at 15:14
    
@Badiboy can you explain what is wrong with this answer? As I understand InvariantCulture always has '.' as a decimal separator. So it should work for both systems. –  Alex11223 Jun 26 at 20:10
    
@Alex11223 You are right. That's why I said that this answer is better then more popular one. PS: Friendly speaking this code will also fail if you have the "," as LIST SEPARATOR (i.e. 1,234,560.01), but I do not know how solve this at all. :) –  Badiboy Jun 27 at 4:56

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