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consider the following data frame:

d <- data.frame(c1=c(rep("a",6),rep("b",6)), 
                c2=c("v1","v1","v2","v3","v3","v1", "v2","v3","v1","v2","v3","v2"), 
                c3=c(1.4,-1.2,1.5,1.6,-1.7,1.2, -1.1,-1.2,1.3,1.5,1.1,-1.9))

I want to add a 4th column c4 that counts how many positive and negative numbers are there for "a" and "b" in column c1. However, only those values in c3 should be considered where c2 equals "v1". Furthermore, if there are only positive or negative values an empty string should be printed

So for my example the 4th column should look like:

> d
   c1 c2   c3 c4
1   a v1  1.4 2/1
2   a v1 -1.2 2/1
3   a v2  1.5 2/1
4   a v3  1.6 2/1
5   a v3 -1.7 2/1
6   a v1  1.2 2/1
7   b v2 -1.1 " "
8   b v3 -1.2 " "
9   b v1  1.3 " "
10  b v2  1.5 " "
11  b v3  1.1 " "
12  b v2 -1.9 " "

for a the value of 2/1 is used as there are two positive numbers and one negative number where c2="v1"

At the moment I came closest using the aggregate function but I still don't really get it right. Not sure if there is a better function to use for that kind of issue?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For anything that uses more than one column (other than the one(s) by which you group), I find plyr more convenient:

ddply(d, "c1", transform,
               c4 = { pos <- sum(c2 == "v1" & c3 >= 0)
                      neg <- sum(c2 == "v1" & c3 < 0)
                      ifelse(pos * neg == 0, ' ', paste(pos, neg, sep = '/')) })

#    c1 c2   c3  c4
# 1   a v1  1.4 2/1
# 2   a v1 -1.2 2/1
# 3   a v2  1.5 2/1
# 4   a v3  1.6 2/1
# 5   a v3 -1.7 2/1
# 6   a v1  1.2 2/1
# 7   b v2 -1.1    
# 8   b v3 -1.2    
# 9   b v1  1.3    
# 10  b v2  1.5    
# 11  b v3  1.1    
# 12  b v2 -1.9    
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for getting back to you guys so late. had some other stuff to do in between. I really appreciate your work you have done here! thanks a lot! –  user969113 Nov 26 '12 at 14:07

If you want to use plain R-base aggregate should be your friend:

ag <- aggregate.data.frame(
  d$c3,
  by = list(d$c1, d$c2),
  FUN = function(x){ paste(sum(x < 0), sum(x>0), sep="/") }
)
> ag
  Group.1 Group.2   x
1       a      v1 1/2
2       b      v1 0/1
3       a      v2 0/1
4       b      v2 2/1
5       a      v3 1/1
6       b      v3 1/1

Then you can just merge the aggregated data into your original data.frame:

d <- merge( d, ag, by.x = c( "c1", "c2" ), by.y = c( "Group.1", "Group.2" ), all.x = TRUE )

However, I'd recommend using ddply from plyr package due to its simplicity:

library("plyr")
d <- ddply( d, c("c1","c2"), function(x) {
  x$c4 <- paste(sum( x$c3 < 0), sum(x$c3 > 0), sep="/")
  return(x)
})

EDIT:

After having reread the question, this should be the right solution using aggregate:

d.sub <- d[ d$c2 == "v1", , drop=FALSE ]
ag <- aggregate(
  d.sub$c3,
  by = list(d.sub$c1),
  FUN = function(x){ # taken from @flodel
    pos <- sum(x < 0);
    neg <- sum( x > 0 );
    ifelse( pos * neg == 0, "", paste( pos, neg, sep="/") )
  }
)
d <- merge( d, ag, by.x = "c1", by.y = "Group.1", all.x = TRUE  )

Concerning the ddply @flodel's solution is how I'd do it either.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you misunderstood the problem, c1 should be the only grouping variable. Then, inside each group, the results are only based on a data subset where c2 == "v1". It's pretty clear from the OP's description and expected output. –  flodel Nov 25 '12 at 12:21
    
@flodel you're right :-) –  Beasterfield Nov 25 '12 at 12:33
    
I feel you've proven that aggregate might not be the best tool for this particular task, as the merge step would be pretty costly. If I were to use a base approach here, then maybe a split/lapply/rbind would be better. Which is what ddply does for you. –  flodel Nov 25 '12 at 13:51
    
@flodel thats why wrote "I'd recommend using ddply". But it was not me who asked for aggregate and sometimes you have to see the ugly solution to appreciate the simple one. –  Beasterfield Nov 25 '12 at 14:19
    
I also want to thank you for your efforts in showing us that ddply should be used over the aggregate function for this particular task. Great thanks –  user969113 Nov 26 '12 at 14:08

Here's another solution with ddply using a slightly different approach:

library(plyr)
ddply(d, .(c1), transform, c4 = {
                        tab <- table(factor(sign(c3[c2 == "v1"]), c(1, -1))); 
                        ifelse(any(tab == 0), " ", paste(tab, collapse = "/")) })



#    c1 c2   c3  c4
# 1   a v1  1.4 2/1
# 2   a v1 -1.2 2/1
# 3   a v2  1.5 2/1
# 4   a v3  1.6 2/1
# 5   a v3 -1.7 2/1
# 6   a v1  1.2 2/1
# 7   b v2 -1.1    
# 8   b v3 -1.2    
# 9   b v1  1.3    
# 10  b v2  1.5    
# 11  b v3  1.1    
# 12  b v2 -1.9
share|improve this answer
    
IMHO, harder to decipher. Also not very flexible around zeroes. –  flodel Nov 25 '12 at 12:27
    
@flodel Why do you think it's not very flexible around zeroes? –  Sven Hohenstein Nov 25 '12 at 12:30
    
Because sign(0) equals 0, no? So they are removed by your current code. If the user wanted instead to count zeroes towards one or the other (positives or negatives), that wouldn't be super easy. –  flodel Nov 25 '12 at 12:34
    
@flodel Agreed, but if the user wanted to count zeroes as a separate category (e.g., 2/0/1), the modifications were: (1) Add , 0 to the factor levels and (2) replace any(tab == 0) by sum(tab == 0) > 1. –  Sven Hohenstein Nov 25 '12 at 12:53
    
Thanks for your solution too. I ticked the first answer as I thought it is slightly more readable even though I am sure it works great :-) thanks! –  user969113 Nov 26 '12 at 14:09

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