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I wrote a very simple User class. The instance variable email has a reader accessor and my own writer accessor that validates the email address with a regex.

class User
    attr_reader :email

    def email=(value)
        if (value =~ /^[a-z\d\-\_\+\.]+@([a-z\d\-]+\.)+[a-z]+$/)
            @email = value
        else
            # bonus question: is ArgumentError the right error type to use here?
            raise ArgumentError, "#{value} is not a valid email address."
        end
    end
end

I wrote the following test:

require 'test/unit'
require_relative '../lib/user'

class TC_UserTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
    def setup
        @user = User.new()
    end

    def test_email
        # using the writer accessor
        @user.email = 'user@example.com'
        # bypassing the writer accessor. evil.
        @user.email[4] = '#'
        assert_equal('user@example.com', @user.email)
    end
end

By using the reference given to me by the reader accessor, I am able to manipulate the email instance variable without going through the writer accessor.

The same principe would apply to any data type that allows manipulation without outright assigning a new value with =

Am I being overzealous? I just want to write robust code. Is there a way to ensure that my email address can only be set using the writer accessor?

I'm new to the language and I'm trying to get a feel for the best practices.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To do what you're trying to do, my advice is to move the regexp into its own validation method.

Better still, don't write an email regexp unless you really want to do it right.

Use a gem instead: https://github.com/SixArm/sixarm_ruby_email_address_validation

After you set the email, freeze it with http://ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Object.html#method-i-freeze

Bonus answer: yes, ArgumentError is the right error type in general. If you're using Rails, consider using the Rails validation methods.

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Thanks for the thorough explanation! I'll take your advice to heart. –  Kenny Rasschaert Nov 25 '12 at 12:09

An option to make the test pass (and protect the @email variable) is to expose a duplicate.

def email
  @email.dup
end
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That hadn't occured to me. It's an interesting way of resolving the problem. I think I'm going with the freeze option. Trying to alter a frozen variable throws a nice error. –  Kenny Rasschaert Nov 26 '12 at 6:37

You can freeze value in writer, that way you'll be able to assign new one via writer, but already assigned would be immutable:

class User
  attr_reader :email

  def email=(value)
    if (value =~ /^[a-z\d\-\_\+\.]+@([a-z\d\-]+\.)+[a-z]+$/)
      # make email immutable:
      @email = value.freeze
    else
      # bonus question: is ArgumentError the right error type to use here?
      raise ArgumentError, "#{value} is not a valid email address."
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the concept of freezing is new to me. Sounds like just what I was looking for. –  Kenny Rasschaert Nov 25 '12 at 12:08

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