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I am having hard time using variadic template with the following problem.

Suppose that all the predicate functors are of the form,

class Pred1 {
public:
    Pred1( Args... ); // The signature Args... can vary class to class.

    template <typename T>
    bool operator()(T t);
};

Given those functors, I want to make a variadic template class which returns true if all the operator() of each predicate return true, i.e.,

template <typename... Preds>
class CombinePredAnd {
public:
    template <typename T>
    bool operator()(T t){
         // returns true if all of the Preds( Args... ).operator()(t) returns true;  
         // Args... should be passed when CombinePredAnd is constructed.
    }
};

To me, I have no idea to pass arguments to each constructor of Preds. Could you give me some hint? Also, if you have better design with the same functionality, please let me know.

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Where do you get Args... from in CombinePredAnd? –  Xeo Nov 25 '12 at 12:07
    
Actually, that is the hardest point in my problem. Is it possible to make such a constructor in CombinePredAnd?? To me it looks impossible. –  Sungmin Nov 25 '12 at 12:14
    
Do you want to pass the same Args... to every predicate, or do you want to have seperate Args... (aka one pack for every predicate)? –  Xeo Nov 25 '12 at 12:15
    
They are not the same. At first, I tried to pass something like {{args1...}, {args2...}, ...}. argsN... is for PredN. –  Sungmin Nov 25 '12 at 12:16
    
Do you want to have a short-circuit behavior (abandon at the first "failure") or don't you care ? –  Matthieu M. Nov 25 '12 at 12:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Maybe like this:

#include <tuple>
#include <type_traits>

template <std::size_t N, std::size_t I, typename Tuple>
struct evaluate_all
{
    template <typename T>
    static bool eval(T const & t, Tuple const & preds)
    {
        return std::get<I>(preds)(t)
            && evaluate_all<N, I + 1, Tuple>::eval(t, preds);
    }
};

template <std::size_t N, typename Tuple>
struct evaluate_all<N, N, Tuple>
{
    template <typename T>
    static bool eval(T const &, Tuple const &)
    {
        return true;
    }
};

template <typename ...Preds>
struct conjunction
{
private:
    typedef std::tuple<Preds...> tuple_type;
    tuple_type preds;

public:
    conjunction(Preds const &... p) : preds(p...) { }

    template <typename T>
    bool operator()(T const & t) const
    {
        return evaluate_all<sizeof...(Preds), 0, tuple_type>::eval(t, preds);
    }
};

template <typename ...Preds>
conjunction<typename std::decay<Preds>::type...> make_conjunction(Preds &&... preds)
{
    return conjunction<typename std::decay<Preds>::type...>(std::forward<Preds>(preds)...);
}

Usage:

auto c = make_conjunction(MyPred(), YourPred(arg1, arg2, arg3));

if (c(10)) { /* ... */ }

Example:

#include <iostream>

typedef int T;

struct Pred1
{
    int a;
    Pred1(int n) : a(n) { }
    bool operator()(int n) const { return n >= a; }
};
struct Pred2
{
    int a;
    Pred2(int n) : a(n) { }
    bool operator()(int n) const { return n <= a; }
};

int main()
{
    auto c = make_conjunction(Pred1(1), Pred2(3));

    std::cout << "1: " << c(1) << "\n"
              << "5: " << c(4) << "\n";
}

Note: You could make the "conjunction" part of this approach parametric as well, so you can have conjunctions and disjunctions just by plugging in std::logical_and or std::logical_or.

share|improve this answer
    
It looks really cool!! Thanks. Very clear :) –  Sungmin Nov 25 '12 at 12:51

Here is an alterative solution to Kerrek SB's:

#include <tuple>
#include <type_traits>
#include <cstdlib>

template <typename HeadPred, typename ...TailPreds>
struct CombinePredAnd 
{
    template<typename H, typename ...Ts>
    explicit CombinePredAnd(H const & h, Ts const &...ts)
    : _preds(h, ts...){}

    template <typename T>
    bool operator()(T t){
        return eval(t,_preds);
    }

private:

    template<typename T, size_t I = 0, typename ...Ps>
    typename std::enable_if<sizeof ...(Ps) == I,bool>::type
    static eval(T t, std::tuple<Ps...>) {
        return true;
    }

    template<typename T, size_t I = 0, typename ...Ps>
    typename std::enable_if<sizeof ...(Ps) != I,bool>::type
    static eval(T t, std::tuple<Ps...> const & preds) {
        auto const & pred = std::get<I>(preds);
        return pred(t) && eval<T,I + 1>(t,preds);
    }

    std::tuple<HeadPred, TailPreds...> _preds;
};

This can be generalized as follows in the way Kerrek SB suggests to a generic conjunction-or-disjunction of arbitrary predicate functors that is parameterized by the choice of conjunction or disjunction. A test program is appended, built with gcc 4.7.2 and clang 3.2:

#include <tuple>
#include <type_traits>
#include <functional>
#include <cstdlib>

template <class AndOrOr, typename HeadPred, typename ...TailPreds>
struct dis_or_con_join 
{
    static_assert(
        std::is_same<AndOrOr,std::logical_and<bool>>::value ||
        std::is_same<AndOrOr,std::logical_or<bool>>::value,     
        "AndOrOr must be std::logical_and<bool> or std::logical_or<bool>");

    template<typename H, typename ...Ts>
    explicit dis_or_con_join(H const & h, Ts const &...ts)
    : _preds(h, ts...){}

    template <typename T>
    bool operator()(T t){
        return eval(t,_preds);
    }

private:

    static const bool conjunction = 
        std::is_same<AndOrOr,std::logical_and<bool>>::value;

    template<typename T, size_t I = 0, typename ...Ps>
    typename std::enable_if<sizeof ...(Ps) == I,bool>::type
    static eval(T t, std::tuple<Ps...>) {
        return conjunction;
    }

    template<typename T, size_t I = 0, typename ...Ps>
    typename std::enable_if<sizeof ...(Ps) != I,bool>::type
    static eval(T t, std::tuple<Ps...> const & preds) {
        auto lamb = conjunction ? 
            [](bool b){ return b; } :
            [](bool b){ return !b; };               
        auto const & pred = std::get<I>(preds);
        return lamb(lamb(pred(t)) && lamb(eval<T,I + 1>(t,preds)));
    }

    std::tuple<HeadPred, TailPreds...> _preds;
};

template<typename HeadPred, typename ...TailPreds>
using conjunction  = 
dis_or_con_join<std::logical_and<bool>,HeadPred,TailPreds...>;

template<typename HeadPred, typename ...TailPreds>
using disjunction =
dis_or_con_join<std::logical_or<bool>,HeadPred,TailPreds...>;


// Test...

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

// For various predicates with various constructors...

template<typename T>
struct is_in_list
// Stores an arbitrary sized list of its type T constructor arguments
// and then with tell us whether any given T is in its list 
{
    is_in_list(initializer_list<T> il)
    : _vals(il.begin(),il.end()){}
    bool operator()(T t) const {
        return find(_vals.begin(),_vals.end(),t) != _vals.end();
    }
    list<T> _vals;
};

int main()
{
    is_in_list<char> inl03 = {'\0','\3'};
    is_in_list<long> inl013 = {0,1,3};
    is_in_list<float> inl0123 = {0.0f,1.0f,2.0f,3.0f};

    conjunction<is_in_list<char>,is_in_list<long>,is_in_list<float>> 
    conj{inl03,inl013,inl0123};
    disjunction<is_in_list<char>,is_in_list<long>,is_in_list<float>> 
    disj{inl03,inl013,inl0123};

    cout << "conjunction..." << endl;
    cout << 1 << " is " << (conj(1) ? "" : "not ") 
        << "in all the lists" << endl;
    cout << 0 << " is " << (conj(0) ? "" : "not ") 
        << "in all the lists" << endl;
    cout << 3 << " is " << (conj(3) ? "" : "not ") 
        << "in all the lists" << endl;
    cout << "disjunction..." << endl;       
    cout << 1 << " is in " << (disj(1) ? "at least one " : "none ") 
        << "of the lists" << endl;
    cout << 2 << " is in " << (disj(2) ? "at least one " : "none ") 
        << "of the lists" << endl;
    cout << 3 << " is in " << (disj(3) ? "at least one " : "none ") 
        << "of the lists" << endl;
    cout << 4 << " is in " << (disj(4) ? "at least one " : "none ") 
        << "of the lists" << endl;
    return 0;
}

The possibly unclear line:

return lamb(lamb(pred(t)) && lamb(eval<T,I + 1>(t,preds)));

just exploits the equivalence:

P or Q = not(not(P) and not(Q))

Output:-

conjunction...
1 is not in all the lists
0 is in all the lists
3 is in all the lists
disjunction...
1 is in at least one of the lists
2 is in at least one of the lists
3 is in at least one of the lists
4 is in none of the lists
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