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I got into an interesting internet argument about getter and setter methods and encapsulation. Someone said that all they should do is an assignment (setters) or a variable access (getters) to keep them "pure" and ensure encapsulation.

  • Am I right that this would completely defeat the purpose of having getters and setters in the first place and validation and other logic (without strange side-effects of course) should be allowed?
  • When should validation happen?
    • When setting the value, inside the setter (to protect the object from ever entering an invalid state - my opinion)
    • Before setting the value, outside the setter
    • Inside the object, before each time the value is used
  • Is a setter allowed to change the value (maybe convert a valid value to some canonical internal representation)?

Before you close this question as a duplicate: I've spent a lot of time searching here and I haven't found any answer to these specific questions. If you can show me a question that answers them, I'll gladly delete this one.

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closed as off topic by phant0m, David Segonds, Nikolai Ruhe, Jon Clements, Tonny Madsen Nov 25 '12 at 14:30

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This is probably a question better suited for programmers.stackexchange.com –  Jon Clements Nov 25 '12 at 12:01
    
@JonClements: How can it be migrated there? Is that something only mods can do? –  Botond Balázs Nov 25 '12 at 12:25
    
Yup - 'fraid so, but I've flagged as more suited for programmers - so hopefully it'll end up there (save creating it there, and having this migrated, then duplicate questions etc...) –  Jon Clements Nov 25 '12 at 12:31
    
@JonClements: thanks. –  Botond Balázs Nov 25 '12 at 12:33

2 Answers 2

I would completely agree; though I would say that validation is part of the legitimate business of accessors - especially setters! Allowing unvalidated setters is VERY poor practice.

An object propagating invalid data means you have to worry about its properties outside it, and that is seriously breaking encapsulation.

If there is a legitimate reason for unchecked accessors, supply both, named get and unchecked_Get etc to make it clear which is preferred, along the lines of Unchecked_Access in my preferred object oriented language.

Just re-reading Fowler's "Refactoring" and he is of the opinion that a class with only raw accessors should probably deleted and refactored into as adding no value.

Specific answers : (my opinion)

Yes it would defeat the purpose of accessors; it's nearly as bad as making the instance variables public...

Best to validate on construction and setting; then you can trust the object.

Can the setter change the value? I think you have to decide on a case-by-case basis. A general answer would be wrong in some specifics. Sometimes you want the setter to fail and point out the underlying problem, to make you fix it.

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Thanks. I've been planning to read Refactoring for a long time - now I have another reason :) –  Botond Balázs Nov 25 '12 at 12:12

Am I right that this would completely defeat the purpose of having getters and setters in the first place and validation and other logic (without strange side-effects of course) should be allowed?

Yes. If you're getting and setting, its great because you can introduce locks or conversion routines in the future, but if you never need it, just make the members public!

When should validation happen? When setting the value, inside the setter (to protect the object from ever entering an invalid state - my opinion) Before setting the value, outside the setter Inside the object, before each time the value is used

This is up to you. Evaluating and validating everything up front is called amortization, and it's nice because you know the state is always valid. However, if you prefer to do it later, it's called lazy validation, and if you never actually end up using the data, it can increase performance.

Is a setter allowed to change the value (maybe convert a valid value to some canonical representation)?

Sure, this is a great reason to use them. If you need to suddenly support two types of input (metric and standard, for example), you can add logic to the setter in one spot rather than change each instance of its usage throughout the project.

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