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I have been tracing down a problem where a block of my code just stops working. At long last, I identified the line, as seen below:

Log.v(TAG,"Here");
tv.setText("");
Log.v(TAG,"There");

During the time that blocks, the first statement gets called, the second one doesn't. Any idea what could be causing this?

In case there's any doubt, tv is a TextView. There is no errors printed out, and in fact, this line worked once previously...

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Have you any kind of a listener added? Or is this a pure TextView or have you extended it? –  WarrenFaith Nov 25 '12 at 12:37
    
It is not possible to block with the code you have shown. There is more to this than you are telling us. –  Simon Nov 25 '12 at 12:38
    
Normally it is an extended view, but I tried it with a pure text view, with the same effect. –  PearsonArtPhoto Nov 25 '12 at 12:40
    
Collect method tracing on this section of code using Debug, then examine the results in Traceview, and see what it tells you. The only things that seem likely to be at fault would be listeners, watchers, filters, etc. that you might have set up on the TextView. But, Traceview may be able to help you pinpoint a cause. –  CommonsWare Nov 25 '12 at 12:51
    
Well, I managed to find the solution. It was a bit wacky, but... –  PearsonArtPhoto Nov 25 '12 at 13:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I figured out what my problem was, I'm posting the answer here to help anyone out in the future. It might be an Android bug, or something odd... No error was ever posted. Bottom line is, don't make GUI calls in a ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor.

ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor masterExecutor;

masterExecutor=new ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor(1);

masterExecutor.schedule(new Runnable(){
    @Override
    public void run() {
        //Formerly, I ran the block of code here, that blocked.
        runOnUiThread ( new Runnable()
        {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                //Now I moved the code inside of a runOnUiThread
            }
        });

    }
},1000,TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
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1  
It should have crashed with an exception. I forget the exact RuntimeException class they use, but the error message used to be something like "attempted to modify the UI from a non-UI thread". Hence, rather than use ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor, use postDelayed() to implement a timing loop that does not require a background thread. –  CommonsWare Nov 25 '12 at 13:57
    
Seriously... A nice RuntimeException would have saved me 2 hours... –  PearsonArtPhoto Nov 25 '12 at 15:15

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