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Hey I have been programming for a few years now and just recently I was wondering what is best to do in a method that is always going to return something:

if($age < 18) {
    return 'Under 18';
}
else {
    return 'Adult';
}

Or is it better to use:

if($age < 18) {
    return 'Under 18';
}
return 'Adult';

In the latter if they are under 18 the program will return 'Under 18' and terminate the rest of the function so is there any need for that else{} in the first example? Thanks.

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closed as not constructive by phant0m, Mischa, tereško, Linger, Mark Nov 26 '12 at 0:12

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Obviously there is no difference in this case, you know that yourself. So what is your real question? –  arkascha Nov 25 '12 at 12:45
    
Use the latter, if you need an opinion on that. –  Havelock Nov 25 '12 at 12:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's better to return early. Nested if elses make conditionals even worse!

Simplified (no elses) Example

//nested (without return)
if ($a == 1) {
    if ($a == 2) {
        if ($a > 2) {

        }
    }
}

//return early
if ($a == 1) {
    return 1;
}

if ($a == 2) {
    return 2;
}

if ($a > 3) {
    return $a;
}

Explanation

The reason returning early is desired is because (in my opinion) of how the brain processes nested ifs. You will notice yourself when reading a nested if structure you always seem to keep track of the previous if conditions. If you flatten it out like i did it's easier for your brain to process (weird considering it does the same thing).

Returning early in general is better because you don't have to read ALL the code up until the return statement - it's also faster to execute but how much faster depends on the code itself.

Further Reading

http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/118703/where-did-the-notion-of-one-return-only-come-from

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Further reading = exact duplicate in programmers.stackexchange.com lol –  Francisco Presencia Nov 25 '12 at 13:12
1  
The reason returning early is desired is because of how the brain processes nested ifs. Evidence? I don't have a problem with either. –  phant0m Nov 25 '12 at 13:20
1  
No, then I refactor it. It's just that you seem to voice an opinion but dress it up as a fact, also you're exaggerating from the OP's original code. –  phant0m Nov 25 '12 at 13:24
1  
@phant0m You again!!!... –  VBAssassin Nov 25 '12 at 15:00
1  
@phant0m Oh sh*t, my bad lmao. Forgot i posted this answer >< –  VBAssassin Nov 25 '12 at 15:06

I don't think there's a right or wrong way with both of these examples. Both work - Personal coding style is the main factor really. I myself would use the latter style, as that way the function/method will always have something to return even if the if statement is borked (in more complex situations).

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Some say it's matter of personal taste, but I think that it's best to have one entry point and one exit point in the method/function as this usually helps debugging and controlling function flow (so you are not "surprised" by sudden return in middle of the code. So ny code would rather be:

$result = 'Adult';
if($age < 18) {
    $result = 'Under 18';
}

return $result;

aside from example code being not really fortunate as it should be rather written:

return ($age < 18) ? 'Under 18' : 'Adult';
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1  
Some say it's matter of personal taste, but I think no "but" ;) –  phant0m Nov 25 '12 at 12:50
    
@phant0m You mean I wrote this wrong in English? Could be (I'm not native) - mind pointing to any exact English rule I violated or something that I could read more about that? –  Marcin Orlowski Nov 25 '12 at 12:52
    
"Silent" downvoter mind speaking up to discuss his vote? –  Marcin Orlowski Nov 25 '12 at 12:52
    
The but can imply that you don't think it's a matter of taste, the I think part mitigates that to some extent though. As such, the construction just doesn't make too much sense for me, because but is usually used to contradict or contrast the preceding statement ;) Also, I don't think as it should be rather written is appropriate, since it's a matter of style ;) - That's also the reason I "voted to close" on this question. –  phant0m Nov 25 '12 at 12:56
1  
I find the second option you wrote (and I read too late) much much more useful for this case. I have my own answer, but this is a great one, it deserves +1. –  Francisco Presencia Nov 25 '12 at 13:04

As for me - the first one is more readable. But there is no much difference.

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Both are programatically the same (second one maybe an operation more but, in computational terms, completely the same). Therefore, the only changes would be aesthetic. I would suggest the second option if your code is not going to change. But, if it's going to grow, you might be interested in the first option.

If the code is not going to grow, I'd personally set as this:

return ($age < 18) ? 'Under 18' : 'Adult';

Or, depending on your requests, even this could be interesting:

return ($age >= 18);

It takes unnecessary code out making it less bloated while keeping functionality and readability. If you can keep it simple and perfectly understandable, don't complicate yourself. I find tempted to quote Einstein here (;

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