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I am new in programming. I have this piece of code :

public void findFilm ( String nameofFilm ) {  
   int index = -1;
   int i = 0;
   for( Film aFilm : list ) {  
      if( aFilm.gettitle().equals( nameofFilm )) {
         index = i;
         i++;
         break ;
      } 
   }
   if( index >= 0 ) {
      aFilm.print();
   }
   else {
      System.out.println(
         "The film " + nameofFilm + " does not belong to the collection" );
      } 
   }

More specifically, I want to search the list and find if it includes movies with a name same with this i insert. Any ideas ? Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
4  
And what is exactly your problem? Compile errors? Runtime errors? –  rene Nov 25 '12 at 12:47
2  
I think this is a question for Code Review. However I think you code is fine. –  rekire Nov 25 '12 at 12:49
    
What is the question exactly ? –  giorashc Nov 25 '12 at 12:50

4 Answers 4

aFilm is only local to the for-loop you need to print it within the for-loop.

public void findFilm ( String nameofFilm ) {  
   for( Film aFilm : list ) {  
      if( aFilm.gettitle().equals(nameofFilm) ) {
         aFilm.print();
         return;
      } 
   }
   System.out.println(
      "The film " + nameofFilm + " does not belong to the collection");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer return a Film (eventually null) without printing anything. –  Aubin Nov 25 '12 at 12:58
2  
Then return aFilm inside the loop and return null outside it. –  Garrett Hall Nov 25 '12 at 13:01

The aFilm variable is defined in the for loop. Its scope is thus limited to the loop, and the variable can't be used outside of the loop. You could rewrite the loop this way:

Film foundFilm = null;
for (Film aFilm : films) {
    if (aFilm.getTitle().equals(nameOfFilm)) {
        foundFilm = aFilm;
        break;
    }
}
if (foundFilm == null) {
    ...
}
else {
    ...
}

No need for any index or incrementing counter.

And, to make the code even cleaner, you could extract the first part into its own method, and rewrite it like this:

Film foundFilm = findFilmByTitle(films, filmTitle);
if (foundFilm == null) {
    ...
}
else {
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
you should all look for existing answers before answering. @Garret Hall has already answered this question with the same solution –  giorashc Nov 25 '12 at 12:52
    
@giorashc: Learn about race conditions in concurrent systems. Moreover, I think my answer brings some points that other answers don't. –  JB Nizet Nov 25 '12 at 12:57
    
I also find Garret's answer very different, and suboptimal. It mixes finding a film and printing it. My answer cleanly separates both parts. –  JB Nizet Nov 25 '12 at 13:00
    
+1 for the second proposal –  Aubin Nov 25 '12 at 13:00
    
Why get so defensive ? I am aware you probably wrote it while the other one posted it but I always get answers notification while writing my answers and if they look the same I cancel. –  giorashc Nov 25 '12 at 13:01

Using a data index like a map:

SortedMap< String, Film > filmsByTitle = new TreeMap<>();
...
if( ! filmsByTitle.contains( newFilm.getTitle()) {
   filmsByTitle.put( newFilm.getTitle(), newFilm );
}
share|improve this answer

You could opt for a functional approach, e.g. via Guava:

public boolean containsFilm(List<Film> list, final String nameOfFilm) {
    Film film = Iterables.find(list, new Predicate<Film>() {
        @Override
        public boolean apply(Film film) {
            return film.getTitle().equals(nameOfFilm);
        }
    }, null);
    return film != null;
}

Additionally, I would recommend defensively checking for null (film, title, etc). I;ve left the checks out to keep the example simple.

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1  
The above would throw a NoSuchElementException if the film is not there. You would need to use the overloaded find() method taking a default value as argument (null in this case). –  JB Nizet Nov 25 '12 at 13:48
    
Indeed, good catch -- thank you! I will adjust the example... –  netzwerg Nov 25 '12 at 15:45

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