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I have decided to face this monster called concurrency and broaden my threading knowledge, so before I read through Joshua Bloch's book, I decided to code something random to help me understand the problem I might face before reading the book, hopefully I can then come to my code and make corrections but then I landed into this pit and I am hoping someone can explain.

I have the following:

public class Arithmetic implements Runnable {
    int number;    
    public  Arithmetic(int x){      
      this.number = number + x;
    }
    @Override
    public void run() {         
        Thread.currentThread().setName("thread-"+number +" > " + "number = "+getNumber());
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName());        
    }    
        public  int getNumber() {
        return number;
    }
    public  void setNumber(int number) {
        this.number = getNumber() + number;
    }
}

Then a main class:

public class Main {  
    public static void main(String[] args) {    
      System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName());     
      for (int x=0; x<=5; x++){    
           Thread thread = new Thread(new Arithmetic(x));           
           thread.start();       
      }
    }
}

With this I get the following as output:

run:
main
thread-0 > number = 0
thread-1 > number = 1
thread-2 > number = 2
thread-3 > number = 3
thread-5 > number = 5
thread-4 > number = 4

Notice: The 5 comes before 4

But then I change my main class to:

public class Main {  
    public static void main(String[] args) {    
      System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName());     
      for (int x=0; x<=5; x++){    
           Runnable runnable  = new Arithmetic(x);           
          runnable.run();      
      }
    }
}

I get the output below:

run:
main
thread-0 > number = 0
thread-1 > number = 1
thread-2 > number = 2
thread-3 > number = 3
thread-4 > number = 4
thread-5 > number = 5

Notice: Correct sequence

I was hoping both main(s) will produce erratic result(Like Thread implementation), then I would then use some thread safety measures like synchronised access etc. but why does the Runnable call act as if Arithmetic is thread safe?

IMO, the difference between extending Thread class and implementing Runnable is for decoupling purposes. Apologies if this is a duplicate question, I can't seem to find an answer.

Thanks in advance.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Runnables do not start new threads it is simply and interface, so this means your second piece of code runs synchronously.

Threads are new threads so you they can run in parallel, which is why the output comes out of order - the 4th thread executes slower than the 5th.

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The thing is when you do

Thread t = new Thread(new Arithemetic())
 t.start();

The thread t is started and it executed Arithmetic.

In your case you are calling runnable.run();, which means the current thread shall call code inside your run(). It is similar to calling any other method.

Ultimately, your current thread in itself is executing the run method 5 times

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Your Runnables are all executing in the main thread (and in that code there is only the one "main" thread).

Your threads all execute separately, and java give no guarantee that once started threads will execute in any particular order.

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+1 for " all executing in the main thread". But maybe add a remark that the main thread gets renamed all the time, which causes confusion. It is still just one thread, though, of course. –  Thilo Nov 25 '12 at 13:04
    
Thanks Bohemian and others, all clear now.. :) –  Babajide Prince Nov 25 '12 at 13:12

Because Runnable itself doesn't run on a seperate thread. It is just an interface used for passing a method implementation around. One example of such is passing it to a Thread constructor (as you have done in your first example). Thus in your second example, nothing is being executed concurrently; it's just executing the run() methods one after the other.

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