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It is said in Spring javadoc, that "Note that the Lifecycle interface is only supported on top-level singleton beans." Here URL

My LifecycleBeanTest.xml describes bean as follows:

<beans ...>
    <bean id="lifecycle" class="tests.LifecycleBean"/>
</beans>

so it looks "topish" and "singletonish" enough.

What does it mean? How to make Spring know about my bean implementing Lifecycle and do something with it?

Suppose my main method looks following in Spring

public static void main(String[] args) {
    new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("/tests/LifecycleBeanTest.xml").close();
}

so, it instantiates context and then closes it immediately.

May I create some bean in my configuration, which delays close() execution until application do all it's works? So that main method thread wait for application termination?

For example, the following bean does not work in way I thought. Neither start() not stop() is called.

package tests;

import org.slf4j.Logger;
import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory;
import org.springframework.context.Lifecycle;

public class LifecycleBean implements Lifecycle {

    private static final Logger log = LoggerFactory.getLogger(LifecycleBean.class);

    private final Thread thread = new Thread("Lifecycle") {
        {
            setDaemon(false);
            setUncaughtExceptionHandler(new UncaughtExceptionHandler() {

                @Override
                public void uncaughtException(Thread t, Throwable e) {
                    log.error("Abnormal thread termination", e);
                }
            });
        }

        public void run() {
            for(int i=0; i<10 && !isInterrupted(); ++i) {
                log.info("Hearbeat {}", i);
                try {
                    sleep(1000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    return;
                }
            }
        };
    };


    @Override
    public void start() {
        log.info("Starting bean");
        thread.start();
    }

    @Override
    public void stop() {
        log.info("Stopping bean");
        thread.interrupt();
        try {
            thread.join();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
            return;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isRunning() {
        return thread.isAlive();
    }

}

UPDATE 1

I know I can wait for bean in code. It is interesting to hook into Spring itself.

share|improve this question
    
Try debugging DefaultLifecycleProcessor methods, also you can check the source of AbstractApplicationContext.doClose() and see that no context closing prevention is provided. – Boris Treukhov Nov 25 '12 at 13:55
1  
I don't get however why are trying to prevent the closing from the inside --- you can get the instance of the interesting bean in the main method(because you have the reference to the bean container so you can call 'getBean()` ) and then either check its status periodically or wait for some event the bean has published. – Boris Treukhov Nov 25 '12 at 14:06
    
If you are using SpringJUnit4ClassRunner then you can wait in the test method for some specific bean to finish just the same. By default there's no timeout. It's even simpler with Spring test context framework because you can @autowire beans to the test case class fields. – Boris Treukhov Nov 25 '12 at 19:24
    
The context is supposed to be managed from the outside, resources(file handles, database connections and spring containers) can not decide when to live or die. Start and stop are merely events that fit well into dispatcher servlet and similar dispatchers that work according to the Inversion of Control principle. For example in the gui application when application is closed, OS sends a message to its message loop, this message goes through the chain of dispatchers and finally the bean stop() method will be invoked. – Boris Treukhov Nov 25 '12 at 22:02
1  
You should call start() (as Tomasz pointed out) and stop() manually in your processing code – Boris Treukhov Nov 26 '12 at 8:20

You should use SmartLifecycle instead of Lifecycle. Only the former is working as you expected Lifecycle to work. Make sure you return true in your isRunning() implementation.

I have used SmartLifecycle for asynchronous jobs for which it sounds like designed for. I suppose it will work for you but at the same time you may have a look at ApplicationListener and events like ContextStoppedEvent.

share|improve this answer

You can examine AbstractApplicationContext.doClose() method and see that no interruption of application context closing has been provided by the Spring developers

protected void doClose() {
    boolean actuallyClose;
    synchronized (this.activeMonitor) {
        actuallyClose = this.active && !this.closed;
        this.closed = true;
    }

    if (actuallyClose) {
        if (logger.isInfoEnabled()) {
            logger.info("Closing " + this);
        }

        try {
            // Publish shutdown event.
            publishEvent(new ContextClosedEvent(this));
        }
        catch (Throwable ex) {
            logger.warn("Exception thrown from ApplicationListener handling ContextClosedEvent", ex);
        }

        // Stop all Lifecycle beans, to avoid delays during individual destruction.
        try {
            getLifecycleProcessor().onClose();
        }
        catch (Throwable ex) {
            logger.warn("Exception thrown from LifecycleProcessor on context close", ex);
        }

        // Destroy all cached singletons in the context's BeanFactory.
        destroyBeans();

        // Close the state of this context itself.
        closeBeanFactory();

        // Let subclasses do some final clean-up if they wish...
        onClose();

        synchronized (this.activeMonitor) {
            this.active = false;
        }
    }
}

So you can't prevent the application context from closing.

Testing the service with TestContext framework

If you are using Spring test context framework with JUnit, I think you can use it to test services that implement Lifecycle, I used the technique from one of the internal Spring tests

Slightly modified LifecycleBean(I've added waitForTermination() method):

public class LifecycleBean implements Lifecycle {

    private static final Logger log = LoggerFactory
            .getLogger(LifecycleBean.class);

    private final Thread thread = new Thread("Lifecycle") {
        {
            setDaemon(false);
            setUncaughtExceptionHandler(new UncaughtExceptionHandler() {

                @Override
                public void uncaughtException(Thread t, Throwable e) {
                    log.error("Abnormal thread termination", e);
                }
            });
        }

        public void run() {
            for (int i = 0; i < 10 && !isInterrupted(); ++i) {
                log.info("Hearbeat {}", i);
                try {
                    sleep(1000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    return;
                }
            }
        };
    };

    @Override
    public void start() {
        log.info("Starting bean");
        thread.start();
    }

    @Override
    public void stop() {
        log.info("Stopping bean");
        thread.interrupt();
        waitForTermination();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isRunning() {
        return thread.isAlive();
    }

    public void waitForTermination() {
        try {
            thread.join();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
            return;
        }
    }
}

Test class:

@RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.class)
@ContextConfiguration("classpath:Test-context.xml")
public class LifecycleBeanTest {

    @Autowired
    LifecycleBean bean;

    Lifecycle appContextLifeCycle;

    @Autowired
    public void setLifeCycle(ApplicationContext context){
        this.appContextLifeCycle = (Lifecycle)context;
    }

    @Test
    public void testLifeCycle(){
        //"start" application context
        appContextLifeCycle.start();

        bean.waitForTermination();
    }
}

Test-context.xml content:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd">

<bean class="LifecycleBean"/>
</beans>

P.S. starting and stopping the context is not a thing you may want to do many times on the same application context, so you may need to put @DirtiesContextannotation on your test methods for the best results.

Answer to the new version of the question

DefaultLifecycleProcessor uses beanFactory.getBeanNamesForType(Lifecycle.class, false, false); to retrieve the list of the beans implementing Lifecycle From getBeanNamesForType javadoc:

NOTE: This method introspects top-level beans only. It does not check nested beans which might match the specified type as well.

So this method does not list the inner beans (they were called nested when only xml configuration was available - they are declared as nested bean xml elements).

Consider the following example from the documentation

<bean id="outer" class="...">
  <!-- Instead of using a reference to target, just use an inner bean -->
  <property name="target">
    <bean class="com.mycompany.PersonImpl">
      <property name="name"><value>Tony</value></property>
      <property name="age"><value>51</value></property>
    </bean>
  </property>
</bean>

Start() and Stop() are merely events that are propagated by the application context they are not connected with lifetime of the application context, for example you can implement a download manager with some service beans - when the user hits "pause" button, you will broadcast the "stop" event, then when the user hits "start" button, you can resume the processing by broadcasting the "start" event. Spring is usable here, because it dispatches events in the proper order.

share|improve this answer

I never used Lifecycle interface and I am not sure how it is suppose to work. But it looks like simply calling start() on context calls these callbacks:

AbstractApplicationContext ctx = new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("...");
ctx.start();

However typically I use @PostConstruct/@PreDestroy annotations or implement InitializingBean or DisposableBean:

public class LifecycleBean implements InitializingBean, DisposableBean {

    @Override
    public void afterPropertiesSet() {
        //...
    }

    @Override
    public void destroy() {
        //...
    }

}

Notice I don't call close() on application context. Since you are creating non-daemon thread in LifecycleBean the JVM remains running even when main exits.

When you stop that thread JVM exists but does not close application context properly. Basically last non-daemon thread stops, causing the whole JVM to terminate. Here is a bit hacky workaround - when your background non-daemon thread is about to finish, close the application context explicitly:

public class LifecycleBean implements ApplicationContextAware /* ... */ {

    private AbstractApplicationContext applicationContext;

    @Override
    public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext applicationContext) {
        this.applicationContext = (AbstractApplicationContext)applicationContext;
    }

    public void run() {
        for(int i=0; i<10 && !isInterrupted(); ++i) {
            log.info("Hearbeat {}", i);
            try {
                sleep(1000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            }
        }
        applicationContext.close();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
I need to delay main() method exiting somehow. Because if use not main but jUnit test method, non-daemon thread does not help: jUnit feels that method have exited and terminates JVM with System.exit() – Suzan Cioc Nov 25 '12 at 16:33

So, finally I foundm that if I:

1) Define my bean as implements Lifecycle

2) Introduce a delay in stop() method like this

@Override
public void stop() {
    log.info("Stopping bean");
    //thread.interrupt();
    try {
        thread.join();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
        return;
    }
}

3) And code context creation as follows:

new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("/tests/LifecycleBeanTest.xml").stop();

Then I get what I want:

context creation code does not exit until all stops of all Lifecycle beans executed. So, this code works in JUnit tests

share|improve this answer
    
That will cause some of the beans to be stopped, while other will wait for one broken bean, and it works only with the default implementation of the LifecycleProcessor - the synchronous one, more advanced implementations(asynchronous) may stop all other beans and log a timeout exception. Why invent the wheel? – Boris Treukhov Nov 26 '12 at 14:30
    
Also using a specialized test runner - SpringJUnit4ClassRunner is the official way to run JUnit integration tests with Spring. static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.1.x/… – Boris Treukhov Nov 26 '12 at 16:19

What about using SmartLifecycle? Seems like it provides all necessary functionality.

There is method public void stop(Runnable contextStopping) {}. And you can continue app context closing by executing passed in contextStopping in time you want.

In my environment all works fine even on J-UNIT, of course by running them with SpringJUnit4ClassRunner.

share|improve this answer

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