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I understand the structure alignment is 'implementation specific', but just wondering if there is any simple way to calculate the structure alignment, for example:

typedef struct
{
    char c;
    int  i;
} test;

if sizeof(test) - (sizeof(char) + sizeof(int)) == 0 means alignment is  1 byte;
if sizeof(test) - (sizeof(char) + sizeof(int)) == 1 means alignment is  2 bytes;
// ...etc...

Is the above assumption reliably true?

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4 Answers 4

Your method is not reliable in the general case: if you tried it on this struct:

typedef struct
{
    int i1;
    int i2;
} test;

it would give you zero as the result, which is probably not the alignment.

Here is a method that works, though:

#include <stddef.h>

struct dummy
{
    char x;
    test t;
};

size_t test_alignment = offsetof(struct dummy, t);
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#include <stddef.h> struct dummy { char x; int i; }; size_t test_alignment = offsetof(struct dummy, i); does above work? –  c-stranger Aug 31 '09 at 1:04
    
Depends on what you mean by "works". It sets test_alignment to the alignment of i inside struct dummy. If that's what you want it to do, then it certainly does work. –  Chris Lutz Aug 31 '09 at 1:11
    
That would test the alignment of type int (I assumed you wanted to test the alignment of the defined type test?) –  caf Aug 31 '09 at 1:13

And here's the macro I have in my toolbox (using caf's technique) to get the alignment of a type:

#define ALIGNMENT_OF(t) offsetof( struct { char x; t dummy; }, dummy)

So now you can use such expressions as:

typedef struct
{
    char c;
    int  i;
} test;

size_t x = ALIGNMENT_OF( test);    // will likely set x = 4

Note that a particular compiler might support a non-standard intrinsic that you might prefer to use (for example, MSVC at some point started supporting an __alignof() intrinsic). My header defines ALIGNMENT_OF() using that intrinsic if it detects a compiler that supports it (though I honestly don't know what advantage the intrinsic provides).

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If I'm not mistaken, your macro has undefined behavior because offsetof is not required to work on anonymous structs passed as an argument like that. You can fix it by writing out the portable definition of offsetof yourself in the macro body. –  R.. Oct 6 '10 at 7:15

If all you want is a good first guess, then transitively find the maximum size of the largest non-aggregate member in the structure and any nested structures

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Make alligned structures

#pragma pack(1)
struct tight{           
   short element_1;       
   int *element_2;
};
#pragma pack(pop)
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