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I could solve this using loops, but I am trying think in vectors so my code will be more R-esque.

I have a list of names. The format is firstname_lastname. I want to get out of this list a separate list with only the first names. I can't seem to get my mind around how to do this. Here's some example data:

t <- c("bob_smith","mary_jane","jose_chung","michael_marx","charlie_ivan")
tsplit <- strsplit(t,"_")

which looks like this:

> tsplit
[[1]]
[1] "bob"   "smith"

[[2]]
[1] "mary" "jane"

[[3]]
[1] "jose"  "chung"

[[4]]
[1] "michael" "marx"   

[[5]]
[1] "charlie" "ivan"

I could get out what I want using loops like this:

for (i in 1:length(tsplit)){
    if (i==1) {t_out <- tsplit[[i]][1]} else{t_out <- append(t_out, tsplit[[i]][1])} 
}

which would give me this:

t_out
[1] "bob"     "mary"    "jose"    "michael" "charlie"

So how can I do this without loops?

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2  
BTW it may be helpful if you could detail how this is different from your previous questions on the same topic: stackoverflow.com/questions/439526/thinking-in-vectors-with-r stackoverflow.com/questions/1246244/… stackoverflow.com/questions/445059/… –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Aug 31 '09 at 3:23
4  
you mean my utter inability to really learn how to do apply functions in R? Yeah, same issue, different nuance. Thanks for reminding me. –  JD Long Aug 31 '09 at 3:47

10 Answers 10

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can use apply (or sapply)

t <- c("bob_smith","mary_jane","jose_chung","michael_marx","charlie_ivan")
f <- function(s) strsplit(s, "_")[[1]][1]
sapply(t, f)

bob_smith    mary_jane   jose_chung michael_marx charlie_ivan 

       "bob"       "mary"       "jose"    "michael"    "charlie" 

See: A brief introduction to “apply” in R

share|improve this answer
    
that is exactly what I was trying to do. thank you. And welcome to Stack Overflow. I've enjoyed reading your blog. –  JD Long Aug 31 '09 at 1:40
    
Thanks, I enjoy your blog (and tweets) too. –  liebke Aug 31 '09 at 1:53

And one more approach:

t <- c("bob_smith","mary_jane","jose_chung","michael_marx","charlie_ivan")
pieces <- strsplit(t,"_")
sapply(pieces, "[", 1)

In words, the last line extracts the first element of each component of the list and then simplifies it into a vector.

How does this work? Well, you need to realise an alternative way of writing x[1] is "["(x, 1), i.e. there is a function called [ that does subsetting. The sapply call applies calls this function once for each element of the original list, passing in two arguments, the list element and 1.

The advantage of this approach over the others is that you can extract multiple elements from the list without having to recompute the splits. For example, the last name would be sapply(pieces, "[", 2). Once you get used to this idiom, it's pretty easy to read.

share|improve this answer
    
Hadley, I see this works, but I haven't the slightest idea why it works. Is there an implied "]" somehow? Can you elaborate a bit? My R-foo is clearly weak. –  JD Long Aug 31 '09 at 5:01
    
I was a little shocked by this, too, JD... so after a little playing, I see that: > "["(pieces,1) yields [[1]] [1] "bob" "smith" ... an interesting notation, to be sure, and very useful! –  William Doane Aug 31 '09 at 15:34
    
Just as a side note, if you are going to split on fixed strings instead of regexps, you might want to consider passing fixed=TRUE to strsplit. I've found that this can have a large impact on the speed of strsplit. –  Jonathan Chang Aug 31 '09 at 19:46
6  
All operators in R are functions - infix operators can be written in prefix notation. TRUE || FALSE can be written as ||(TRUE,FALSE), a[b] can be written as [(a,b), and even assignment operators a[b] <- TRUE is [<-(a,b,value=TRUE). R is magic. –  crippledlambda Sep 1 '09 at 5:09
    
Not sure if it came out correctly there but there should be quotes (I used backtick but regular quotes should also work) around the prefix functions. –  crippledlambda Sep 1 '09 at 5:10

How about:

tlist <- c("bob_smith","mary_jane","jose_chung","michael_marx","charlie_ivan")
fnames <- gsub("(_.*)$", "", tlist)
# _.* matches the underscore followed by a string of characters
# the $ anchors the search at the end of the input string
# so, underscore followed by a string of characters followed by the end of the input string

for the RegEx approach?

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1  
+1 for being the fastest. With rep(t, 1e4), my approach took 83.23 seconds (81.41 of which were spent converting to a data frame!), David's took 4.39s, and yours took 0.81. I think it has the best output, too. –  Matt Parker Aug 31 '09 at 3:23
1  
Thanks, Matt... I was wondering about the efficiency of each of these solutions! –  William Doane Aug 31 '09 at 3:31
1  
that's really informative. I had just assumed the strsplit bit was a given. Wow. Good to see another way of doing it. –  JD Long Aug 31 '09 at 3:49

what about:

t <- c("bob_smith","mary_jane","jose_chung","michael_marx","charlie_ivan")

sub("_.*", "", t)
share|improve this answer
    
that totally works! Thanks. –  JD Long Jan 26 '10 at 21:22

I doubt this is the most elegant solution, but it beats looping:

t.df <- data.frame(tsplit)
t.df[1, ]

Converting lists to data frames is about the only way I can get them to do what I want. I'm looking forward to reading answers by people who actually understand how to handle lists.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this. I 'get' the data.frame structure. And since my real data has the same number of items in each "name" then this should not be less memory efficient. Why didn't I think of this! –  JD Long Aug 31 '09 at 1:37
    
Note that this approach takes a hell of a long time with larger data - see my comment on William Doane's answer. –  Matt Parker Aug 31 '09 at 3:24

You almost had it. It really is just a matter of

  1. using one of the *apply functions to loop over your existing list, I often start with lapply and sometimes switch to sapply
  2. add an anonymous function that operates on one of the list elements at a time
  3. you already knew it was strsplit(string, splitterm) and that you need the odd [[1]][1] to pick off the first term of the answer
  4. just put it all together, starting with a preferred variable namne (as we stay clear of t or c and friends)

which gives

> tlist <- c("bob_smith","mary_jane","jose_chung","michael_marx","charlie_ivan") 
> fnames <- sapply(tlist, function(x) strsplit(x, "_")[[1]][1]) 
> fnames 
  bob_smith    mary_jane   jose_chung michael_marx charlie_ivan   
      "bob"       "mary"       "jose"    "michael"    "charlie" 
>
share|improve this answer
    
I really have struggled with getting my mind around properly using the apply functions in R. Some days it feels like learning to drive on the opposite side of the road.. it's really not hard but the simple round-a-bouts result in a mental log jam. –  JD Long Sep 2 '09 at 14:51
1  
I do it in a leg-alike fashion. You knew strsplit. You knew you needed an 'anon function' of one parameter for the apply family. Just stick'em together.... Lastly, and not to nit-pick, I posted this before the essentially identical but less verbose answer you accepted as 'the' answer. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Sep 2 '09 at 15:53
    
Typo: 'lego-alike', not 'leg-alike' –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Sep 2 '09 at 15:53
    
Dirk, one of the things I have noticed about being a novice at R is that it is very hard to see that two given problems are similar. I think with expertise comes the ability to chose meaningful analogies quickly. I'm slowly getting to where I can see patterns. I appreciate your comment above about figuring out what the lego bricks are. I'm still growing in my ability to look at a problem and see that I need an anon function, for example. –  JD Long Sep 9 '09 at 15:57

You could use unlist():

> tsplit <- unlist(strsplit(t,"_"))
> tsplit
 [1] "bob"     "smith"   "mary"    "jane"    "jose"    "chung"   "michael"
 [8] "marx"    "charlie" "ivan"   
> t_out <- tsplit[seq(1, length(tsplit), by = 2)]
> t_out
[1] "bob"     "mary"    "jose"    "michael" "charlie"

There might be a better way to pull out only the odd-indexed entries, but in any case you won't have a loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Not ideal as you need impose the 'by = 2' to pick the matching elements. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Aug 31 '09 at 1:32

And one other approach, based on brentonk's unlist example...

tlist <- c("bob_smith","mary_jane","jose_chung","michael_marx","charlie_ivan")
tsplit <- unlist(strsplit(tlist,"_"))
fnames <- tsplit[seq(1:length(tsplit))%%2 == 1]

share|improve this answer

I would use the following unlist()-based method:

> t <- c("bob_smith","mary_jane","jose_chung","michael_marx","charlie_ivan")
> tsplit <- strsplit(t,"_")
> 
> x <- matrix(unlist(tsplit), 2)
> x[1,]
[1] "bob"     "mary"    "jose"    "michael" "charlie"

The big advantage of this method is that it solves the equivalent problem for surnames at the same time:

> x[2,]
[1] "smith" "jane"  "chung" "marx"  "ivan" 

The downside is that you'll need to be certain that all of the names conform to the firstname_lastname structure; if any don't then this method will break.

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from the original tsplit list object given at the beginning, this command will do:

unlist(lapply(tsplit,function(x) x[1]))

it extracts the first element of all list elements, then transforms a list to a vector. Unlisting first to a matrix, then extracting the fist column is also ok, but then you are dependent on the fact that all list elements have the same length. Here is the output:

> tsplit

[[1]]
[1] "bob"   "smith"

[[2]]
[1] "mary" "jane"

[[3]]
[1] "jose"  "chung"

[[4]]
[1] "michael" "marx"   

[[5]]
[1] "charlie" "ivan"   

> lapply(tsplit,function(x) x[1])

[[1]]
[1] "bob"

[[2]]
[1] "mary"

[[3]]
[1] "jose"

[[4]]
[1] "michael"

[[5]]
[1] "charlie"

> unlist(lapply(tsplit,function(x) x[1]))

[1] "bob"     "mary"    "jose"    "michael" "charlie"
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