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If we have classical decimal format in int long, we can do something like that:

const long int NUMBER = 4577;         
const long int DIGIT_TO_FIND = 5;

long int thisNumber = NUMBER >= 0 ? NUMBER : -NUMBER; 
long int thisDigit;

while (thisNumber != 0)
{
    thisDigit = thisNumber % 10;    
    thisNumber = thisNumber / 10;    
    if (thisDigit == DIGIT_TO_FIND)
    {
        printf("%d contains digit %d", NUMBER, DIGIT_TO_FIND);
        break;
    }
}

But what about binary representing or octal representing in int long? We have:

const long int NUMBER = 01011111; // octal
const long int DIGIT_TO_FIND1 = 0;         
const long int DIGIT_TO_FIND2 = 1;

Correct input:

01010101
11111111

Bad input:

02010101 (because two)
00000009 (because nine)

We need to check if int long contains only 0 or 1. What is the simpliest way to check correct input for that? Maybe just easy question, but no idea, thank you.

share|improve this question
4  
01011111 is octal. –  Pubby Nov 25 '12 at 17:45
    
It's not clear what you want here. You want to check that the decimal representation of a number 'x' contains only 1s and 0s? Because if you represented it in binary it by definition will have... –  jcoder Nov 25 '12 at 18:00
    
@J99 I think he has a long with a number consisting of ones and zeros which although is a decimal is actually a binary number. He then wants to verify that the digits are 1/0 only... why I don't know! –  Caribou Nov 25 '12 at 18:02
    
So, we have: const long int NUMBER = 01011111; That is correct, because contains only 0 or 1. The wrong input will be something like: long int NUMBER = 01011112; –  RePRO Nov 25 '12 at 18:04
2  
@RePRO You probably have not initialized the number you think you have (01011111 == 266825). See this article on integer literals: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/00a1awxf%28v=vs.80%29.aspx –  moooeeeep Nov 25 '12 at 18:13

3 Answers 3

To check whether a digit is a valid binary digit, compare it with 1:

if (thisDigit > 1)
{
    printf("%d contains digit %d", NUMBER, thisDigit);
    break;
}

As noted by @Pubby, you have an octal number instead of a decimal number, so use 8 instead of 10 to calculate digits:

thisDigit = thisNumber % 8;    
thisNumber = thisNumber / 8;    
share|improve this answer

If I understand your question something like this -

#include <iostream>

bool check(int number, int search_1, int search_2)
{
    while(number > 0)
    {
        int digit = number % 10;
        number    = number / 10;
        if (digit != search_1 && digit != search_2)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

int main()
{
    const int DIGIT_TO_FIND1 = 0;
    const int DIGIT_TO_FIND2 = 1;

    int number1 = 1001001;
    std::cout << "Checking " << number1 << " : " << check(number1, DIGIT_TO_FIND1, DIGIT_TO_FIND2) <<" \n";

    int number2 = 12110101;
    std::cout << "Checking " << number2 << " : " << check(number2, DIGIT_TO_FIND1, DIGIT_TO_FIND2) <<" \n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thas is not clear solution, try check int number1 = 0001001; and does not works. ;) Cause octal. –  RePRO Nov 25 '12 at 18:26
    
Well don't do that then! To be clear, I mean what can be done about that? You have to know some c++ to use the language, if you want to input a number like this don't use octal:P –  jcoder Nov 25 '12 at 18:42
    
But that is correct: int number1 = 0001001, cause contains 0 or 1. –  RePRO Nov 25 '12 at 18:56
    
I agree with the problem, but the question isn't clearly defined about what he wants to answer it well. –  jcoder Nov 25 '12 at 19:10
    
I figured it out. Look at my solution. Thank you for everyone. –  RePRO Nov 25 '12 at 19:20

My solution. It's really simple.

   bool check(int long number)
   {
     return ((number % 10 != 0) && (number % 10) != 1);
   }
share|improve this answer
    
You only check the very last (base-10) digit of that number in a otherwise not-very-reusable implementation. Is this really to be your final solution? –  moooeeeep Nov 25 '12 at 21:44

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