Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to tell if an array contains all of the elements of another array with duplicates.

[1,2,3].contains_all? [1,2]   #=> true
[1,2,3].contains_all? [1,2,2] #=> false (this is where (a1-a2).empty? fails)
[2,1,2,3].contains_all? [1,2,2] #=> true

So the first array must contain as many or equal of the number of each unique element in the second array.

This question answers it for those using an array as a set, but I need to control for duplicates.

Update: Benchmarks

On Ruby 1.9.3p194

def bench
  puts Benchmark.measure {
    10000.times do
      [1,2,3].contains_all? [1,2]
      [1,2,3].contains_all? [1,2,2]
      [2,1,2,3].contains_all? [1,2,2]
    end
  }
end

Results in:

Rohit   0.100000   0.000000   0.100000 (  0.104486)
Chris   0.040000   0.000000   0.040000 (  0.040178)
Sergio  0.160000   0.020000   0.180000 (  0.173940)
sawa    0.030000   0.000000   0.030000 (  0.032393)

Update 2: Larger Arrays

@a1 = (1..10000).to_a
@a2 = (1..1000).to_a
@a3 = (1..2000).to_a

def bench
  puts Benchmark.measure {
    1000.times do
      @a1.contains_all? @a2
      @a1.contains_all? @a3
      @a3.contains_all? @a2
    end
  }
end

Results in:

Rohit    9.750000   0.410000  10.160000 ( 10.158182)
Chris   10.250000   0.180000  10.430000 ( 10.433797)
Sergio  14.570000   0.070000  14.640000 ( 14.637870)
sawa     3.460000   0.020000   3.480000 (  3.475513)
share|improve this question
    
You should benchmark for much bigger arrays. (Unless its always going to be small for your use-case) –  rohit89 Nov 25 '12 at 18:53
    
looks like @sawa's answer definitely wins for huge arrays, but I'm never going to have arrays that large. Regardless, sawa's implementation seems to be the best so far –  Chris Nov 25 '12 at 19:02
    
If you flip it, like @a2.contains_all? @a1, the hash based answers will be faster. Though for small arrays, it really doesn't matter which way you go. –  rohit89 Nov 25 '12 at 19:08
    
You would probably add a check to make sure the other array is smaller (impossible to return true) so that scenario would be constant time for all. –  Chris Nov 25 '12 at 19:14
add comment

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted
class Array
  def contains_all? other
    other = other.dup
    each{|e| if i = other.index(e) then other.delete_at(i) end}
    other.empty?
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
nice! Seems like the best so far –  Chris Nov 25 '12 at 18:48
add comment

Here's a naive and straightforward implementation (not the most efficient one, likely). Just count the elements and compare both elements and their occurrence counts.

class Array
  def contains_all? ary
    # group the arrays, so that 
    #   [2, 1, 1, 3] becomes {1 => 2, 2 => 1, 3 => 1}
    my_groups = group_and_count self
    their_groups = group_and_count ary

    their_groups.each do |el, cnt|
      if !my_groups[el] || my_groups[el] < cnt
        return false
      end
    end

    true
  end

  private
  def group_and_count ary
    ary.reduce({}) do |memo, el|
      memo[el] ||= 0
      memo[el] += 1
      memo
    end
  end

end

[1, 2, 3].contains_all? [1, 2]   # => true
[1, 2, 3].contains_all? [1, 2, 2] # => false
[2, 1, 2, 3].contains_all? [1, 2, 2] # => true
[1, 2, 3].contains_all? [] # => true
[].contains_all? [1, 2] # => false
share|improve this answer
add comment

Counting the number of occurrences and comparing them seems to be the obvious way to go.

class Array
   def contains_all? arr
       h = self.inject(Hash.new(0)) {|h, i| h[i] += 1; h}
       arr.each do |i|
           return false unless h.has_key?(i)
           return false if h[i] == 0
           h[i] -= 1
       end
       true
   end
end
share|improve this answer
    
If you are caring about speed, changing == 0 to zero? will slightly improve the speed. –  sawa Nov 25 '12 at 19:15
add comment

Answering with my own implementation, but definitely want to see if someone can come up with a more efficient way. (I won't accept my own answer)

class Array
  def contains_all?(a2)
    a2.inject(self.dup) do |copy, el|
      if copy.include? el
        index = copy.index el
        copy.delete_at index
      else
        return false
      end
      copy
    end
    true
  end
end

And the tests:

1.9.3p194 :016 > [1,2,3].contains_all? [1,2]   #=> true
 => true 
1.9.3p194 :017 > [1,2,3].contains_all? [1,2,2] #=> false (this is where (a1-a2).empty? fails)
 => false 
1.9.3p194 :018 > [2,1,2,3].contains_all? [1,2,2] #=> true
 => true 
share|improve this answer
    
did you benchmark your solution against mine? :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Nov 25 '12 at 18:32
    
AFAIK Array#index and Array#include? are O(n). The array is iterated for each call. So if you have large arrays, that could pose a problem. And you can break out of the loop when contains = false. –  rohit89 Nov 25 '12 at 18:39
    
updated, I'll provide benchmarks above –  Chris Nov 25 '12 at 18:44
add comment

It seems you need a multiset. Check out this gem, I think it does what you need.

You can use is and do something like (if the intersection is equal to the second multiset then the first one includes all of its elements):

@ms1 & @ms2 == @ms2
share|improve this answer
add comment

This solution will only iterate through both lists once, and hence run in linear time. It might however be too much overhead if the lists are expected to be very small.

  class Array
    def contains_all?(other)
      return false if other.size > size
      elem_counts = other.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)) { |elem,hash| hash[elem] += 1 }
      each do |elem|
        elem_counts.delete(elem) if (elem_counts[elem] -= 1) <= 0
        return true if elem_counts.empty?
      end
      false
    end
  end
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you can't find a method, you can build one using ruby's include? method.

Official documentation: http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Array.html#method-i-include-3F

Usage:

array = [1, 2, 3, 4]
array.include? 3       #=> true

Then, you can do a loop:

def array_includes_all?( array, comparision_array )
  contains = true
  for i in comparision_array do
    unless array.include? i
      contains = false
    end
  end
  return contains
end

array_includes_all?( [1,2,3,2], [1,2,2] )    #=> true
share|improve this answer
    
but array_includes_all?( [1,2,3], [1,2,2,2] ) will also be true because include?(2) will keep finding the same 2 –  Chris Nov 25 '12 at 18:17
1  
Your code fails on OP's second example. It returns true, when it should return false. –  Sergio Tulentsev Nov 25 '12 at 18:17
    
I'm sorry, I think I misunderstood the question. –  macool Nov 26 '12 at 1:27
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.