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I am working through a book on object oriented PHP and have noticed the author using the complex syntax in some instances. In the chapter on inheritance he uses the code below:

// Declare the getSummaryLine() method
function getSummaryLine() {
// Define what the getSummaryLine() method does
     $base  = "$this->title ( {$this->producerMainName}, ";
     $base .= "{$this->producerFirstName} )";
     return $base;
}

My question is, why wouldn't you just use:

// Declare the getSummaryLine() method
function getSummaryLine() {
// Define what the getSummaryLine() method does
     return "$this->title ( $this->producerMainName, $this->producerFirstName )";
}

As both seem to return the same thing?

Forgive me if this is painfully obvious. I have read up on the PHP complex syntax in the manual but it didn't make things any clearer for me. Is it a security issue, style choice or something else entirely?

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closed as not constructive by Peter O., tereško, Robin, animuson, Nik.... Nov 26 '12 at 4:07

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Not much difference, though it's considered safer to use curly braces around the more complex notations. Perhaps author just doesn't like long lines :) –  Jack Nov 25 '12 at 18:20
    
@MyStream Yes, the quotes are necessary. Omitting them gives a very different result. –  phant0m Nov 25 '12 at 18:23
1  
Welcome to StackOverflow. I have read up on the PHP complex syntax in the manual but it didn't make things any clearer for me. Do you struggle to understand parts of the documentation? If so, ask a question about that. –  phant0m Nov 25 '12 at 18:25
    
@MyStream It doesn't depend on anything in this context. It's simply different. In this case, there will be literal parentheses and commas included in the output. In your case, it tries to call a function title... –  phant0m Nov 25 '12 at 18:27
    
@MyStream Yes, that's what heppens if you run your code, but in the OP's code, it produces a string comprised of: $this->title, an opening parenthesis, $this->producerMainName, a comma, $this->producerFirstName, a closing parenthesis. –  phant0m Nov 25 '12 at 21:25

3 Answers 3

They both achieve the same thing, but the reason for the compounded statement has to do with readability. Longer concatenated strings are simply easier to read, and is nothing more than a code flavour on the authors part.

The complex bit about this has to do with evaluation. Using curly braces you can do this:

echo "This works: {$arr['key']}";
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"$this->producerMainName" does not work... You NEED curly braced to ge it to work: "{$this->producerMainName}"; –  John Nov 25 '12 at 18:20
    
@John That is not true. php.net/manual/en/… –  phant0m Nov 25 '12 at 18:21
    
You are right, Im sorry: sandbox.onlinephpfunctions.com/code/… I got confused by the use of a method: sandbox.onlinephpfunctions.com/code/… (remove the curls), and you need curls to work with arrays. –  John Nov 25 '12 at 18:23
    
Thank you for the answer; that makes things a lot clearer. Much appreciated. –  user1851568 Nov 25 '12 at 20:12

In this case, it's only a matter of style/preference.

The author may feel it's easier to read when it's spread out accross multiple lines and variables are inside curly braces.

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All of these are valid.

Author may have used concatenation just for readability, long lines of code don't go nicely in books too.

You sometimes need a {} around a string from array/object when embedding placing within double quotes or else you'll see a syntax error.

// Declare the getSummaryLine() method
function getSummaryLine() {
// Define what the getSummaryLine() method does
     $base  = "$this->title ( {$this->producerMainName}, ";
     $base .= "{$this->producerFirstName} )";
     return $base;
}

OR

// Declare the getSummaryLine() method
function getSummaryLine() {
// Define what the getSummaryLine() method does
     return "{$this->title} ( {$this->producerMainName}, {$this->producerFirstName} )";
}

Or

// Declare the getSummaryLine() method
function getSummaryLine() {
// Define what the getSummaryLine() method does
     return $this->title.'( '.$this->producerMainName.', '.$this->producerFirstName.' )';
}
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Thank you for the answer; that makes things a lot clearer. Much appreciated. –  user1851568 Nov 25 '12 at 20:12

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