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I'm trying out a JSONP call. I have a NodeJs app in server 1, under domain domain1.com looking like this:

server.get('/api/testjsonp', function(req, res) {

  var clientId = req.param('clientId');

  res.header('Content-Type', 'application/json');
  res.header('Charset', 'utf-8') 
  res.send(req.query.callback + '({"something": "rather", "more": "fun",
          "sourceDomain": "' + req.headers.origin + '"' + ',"clientId":"' + clientId + 
          '"});');  

});

In another server (server 2) and under a different domain (domain2.com), I have created a test html page with a call like this:

    var data = { clientId : 1234567890 };

            $.ajax({
                    dataType: 'jsonp',
                    data: data,
                    jsonp: 'callback',
                    url: 'https://domain1.com/api/testjsonp?callback=1',                        
                    success: function(data) {
                        alert('success');
                    },
        error: function(err){
                        alert('ERROR');
                        console.log(err);
                    }
                });

I have 2 problems here:

1) Why is this working? Isn't it a cross-domain call and therefore I'd need to implement the ALLOW-ORIGIN headers stuff? I'm following this example:

http://css.dzone.com/articles/ajax-requests-other-domains

http://benbuckman.net/tech/12/04/cracking-cross-domainallow-origin-nut

2) In the server, I can't figure out which domain is making the call, req.headers.origin is always undefined. I'd like to be able to know which domain is calling, to prevent unwanted calls. Alternative I could check for the calling IP, any idea how?

Many thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Why is this working? Isn't it a cross-domain call and therefore I'd need to implement the ALLOW-ORIGIN headers stuff? I

Are far as the browser is concerned, you aren't directly reading data from a different origin. You are loading a JavaScript program from another origin (and it happens to have some data bundled in it).

In the server, I can't figure out which domain is making the call, req.headers.origin is always undefined. I'd like to be able to know which domain is calling, to prevent unwanted calls.

The URL of the referring page is stored in the Referer header, not the Origin header. It is, however, optional and won't be sent under many circumstances.

If you want to limit access to the data to certain sites, then you can't use JSON-P. Use plain JSON and CORS instead.

Alternative I could check for the calling IP, any idea how?

That would give you the address of the client, not the server that directed the client to you.

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks for your prompt response. If I understand correctly, it is working as it should (ie no ALLOW-ORIGIN headers required here). In this particular case it's important for me to know which domain is calling. Is there anything the caller domain (which I control) can do so the Referer header is always populated? –  Rafa Llorente Nov 25 '12 at 19:31
    
No, there isn't. –  Quentin Nov 25 '12 at 19:48
    
Server side, I'm looking at req.headers.origin. If provided, I'm assuming the client is using CORS. Otherwise I look at req.headers.referer and assume client is using JSONP. I then compare this value to my list of authorized domains. If authorized, carry on otherwise send error. Is this the right approach to make sure only authorized domains are requesting this service? Thank you –  Rafa Llorente Dec 1 '12 at 19:19

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