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Let's say that I want to track some person objects and their career history records. is this approach should I follow?

public class Person
{
  public int Id {get; set;}
  public string Name {get; set;}
  public Career Career {get; set;}

  public Person()
  {...}
}

public class Career 
{
   public Person Person {get; set;}
   public IList<Company> Companies {get; set;}
   ... 
}

Since this is one to one approach, one person can have one career my question is: Do I need two way link, or better how would you link these two objects?

Thanks

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It would mostly depend on two things: what is the aggregate domain in your application and how are you going to be persisting this?

If you're modelling an application based around careers as the central concept then the Person has no need to know about the career. This could take the form of:

public class Person
{
  public string Name { get; set; }
  ...
}

public class Career
{
   public Person Person { get; set; }
   public IList<Company> Companies { get; set; }
   ...
}

But on the other hand, a career without a person seems a bit strange. Perhaps the Career class is redundant if you focus on people and their careers:

public class Person
{
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public IList<Company> Career { get; set; }
}

Persistance

Of course the persistance method will effect your models. I saw in your comments above that you are intending to store in in a database. But it wasn't clear what kind of database. If you, for example, use a document database such as RavenDB you can directly store both model variants above.

But if you use a relational database and perhaps Entity Framework or some other ORM you will probably need to include some database IDs and foreign key properties depending on how much magic the ORM will do.

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You are creating a circular dependency here, maybe you should remove the Career property from the Person class. Or the other way around; remove Person from Career.

public class Person
{
    public int Id {get; set;}
    public string Name {get; set;}

    public Person()
    {...}
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Where the data will be persisted (if at all) plays a huge role on how you represent the data. From your question it's not clear whether you will be storing this information in a database, xml file, or some other medium.

If you are storing it in a database then the Career would not have a full person object but the PersonID which would serve as a foreign key.

In a pure OOP approach, a Career object would not have a person object in it. A person HAS a career, the career does not HAVE a person.

There are a lot of ways you can represent the data, but it all depends on how you plan on using and storing it.

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It will be stored inside db. –  user1765862 Nov 25 '12 at 18:44
    
so basically you're saying that career should be a value object without id, if I understood you correctly ? –  user1765862 Nov 25 '12 at 18:45
    
Since a Person HAS a career, I would give the person a career_id which maps to a career object and remove the person from the career. I would strongly recommend using a relation database to object mapper, such as Entity Framework. Otherwise you will be doing a lot of work into figuring out how to get the object properly into the database and vice versa (while preserving relationships). With EF, there are two main approaches, Database-First or Code-First. With Database-First you create the database in SQL Management Studio, define the relationships, then VS will generate all the POCO classes. –  Despertar Nov 25 '12 at 18:59
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