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Server Error in '/' Application.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No parameterless constructor defined for this object. 
Description: An unhandled exception occurred during the execution of the current web request. Please review the stack trace for more information about the error and where it originated in the code. 

Exception Details: System.MissingMethodException: No parameterless constructor defined for this object.

Source Error: 


Line 16:             HttpContext.Current.RewritePath(Request.ApplicationPath, false);
Line 17:             IHttpHandler httpHandler = new MvcHttpHandler();
Line 18:             httpHandler.ProcessRequest(HttpContext.Current);
Line 19:             HttpContext.Current.RewritePath(originalPath, false);
Line 20:         }

I was following Steven Sanderson's 'Pro ASP.NET MVC Framework' book. On page 132, in accordance with the author's recommendation, I downloaded the ASP.NET MVC Futures assembly, and added it to my MVC project. [Note: This could be a red herring.]

After this, I could no longer load my project. The above error stopped me cold.

My question is not, "Could you help me fix my code?"

Instead, I'd like to know more generally:

  • How should I troubleshoot this issue?
  • What should I be looking for?
  • What might the root cause be?

It seems like I should understand routing and controllers at a deeper level than I do now.

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15 Answers

up vote 94 down vote accepted

I just had a similar problem. The same exception occurs when a Model has no parameterless constructor.

The call stack was figuring a method responsible for creating a new instance of a model.

System.Web.Mvc.DefaultModelBinder.CreateModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext, Type modelType)


Here is a sample:

public class MyController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Action(MyModel model)
    {

    }
}

public class MyModel
{
    public MyModel(IHelper helper)
    {
        // ...
    }
}
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4  
When POSTing JSON data to my action I was getting a similar error. It turns out my model which it is attempting to bind to does not have a parameterless constructor! –  Jim Oct 6 '11 at 0:48
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This can also be caused if your Model is using a SelectList, as this has no parameterless constructor:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public SelectList Contacts { get;set; }
}

You'll need to refactor your model to do it a different way if this is the cause. So using an IEnumerable<Contact> and writing an extension method that creates the drop down list with the different property definitions:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public Contact SelectedContact { get;set; }
    public IEnumerable<Contact> Contacts { get;set; }
}

public static MvcHtmlString DropDownListForContacts(this HtmlHelper helper, IEnumerable<Contact> contacts, string name, Contact selectedContact)
{
    // Create a List<SelectListItem>, populate it, return DropDownList(..)
}
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I wasted so much time on this... and had to turn my helper function that was returning a SelectList into one that would return a List<SelectListItem>....blarg –  Mark Oct 22 '12 at 13:45
    
ive been breaking my head until i found this.thanks a ton. –  Runner Apr 7 '13 at 14:54
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You need the action that corresponds to the controller to not have a parameter.

Looks like for the controller / action combination you have:

public ActionResult Action(int parameter)
{

}

but you need

public ActionResult Action()
{

}

Also, check out Phil Haack's Route Debugger to troubleshoot routes.

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3  
The exception is related to the Constructor, not the action method. –  Jason Wicker Jul 13 '11 at 0:24
3  
@Logrythmik. The reported exception is for the constructor, but the problem is in the action method. I had a class and action method which were working, then added a parameter to the action method, and got this error. An alternative solution is to provide a value for the parameter. Or make the parameter optional - this should work when the controller's in C#, but it didn't for me with F# –  Javaman59 Nov 11 '11 at 8:09
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By default, MVC Controllers require a default constructor with no parameters. The simplest would be to make a default constructor that calls the one with parameters:

public MyController() : this(new Helper()) {
}

public MyController(IHelper helper) {
  this.helper = helper;
}

However, you can override this functionality by rolling your own ControllerFactory. This way you can tell MVC that when you are creating a MyController give it an instance of Helper.

This allows you to use Dependency Injection frameworks with MVC, and really decouple everything. A good example of this is over at the StructureMap website. The whole quickstart is good, and he gets specific to MVC towards the bottom at "Auto Wiring".

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3  
I don't think this is the correct answer, @swilliams. The key here is the part: defined for this object. That's a crap error message that is actually hinting at the INPUT MODEL(s) passed in cannot be created. So if you have an input model that has no parameterless constructor, then you get this error. Very easy to think it was related to the CONTROLLER constructor. But it's not. –  Pure.Krome May 21 '12 at 0:24
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This error also occurs when using an IDependencyResolver, such as when using an IoC container, and the dependency resolver returns null. In this case ASP.NET MVC 3 defaults to using the DefaultControllerActivator to create the object. If the object being created does not have a public no-args constructor an exception will then be thrown any time the provided dependency resolver has returned null.

Here's one such stack trace:

[MissingMethodException: No parameterless constructor defined for this object.]
   System.RuntimeTypeHandle.CreateInstance(RuntimeType type, Boolean publicOnly, Boolean noCheck, Boolean& canBeCached, RuntimeMethodHandleInternal& ctor, Boolean& bNeedSecurityCheck) +0
   System.RuntimeType.CreateInstanceSlow(Boolean publicOnly, Boolean skipCheckThis, Boolean fillCache) +98
   System.RuntimeType.CreateInstanceDefaultCtor(Boolean publicOnly, Boolean skipVisibilityChecks, Boolean skipCheckThis, Boolean fillCache) +241
   System.Activator.CreateInstance(Type type, Boolean nonPublic) +69
   System.Web.Mvc.DefaultControllerActivator.Create(RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType) +67

[InvalidOperationException: An error occurred when trying to create a controller of type 'My.Namespace.MyController'. Make sure that the controller has a parameterless public constructor.]
   System.Web.Mvc.DefaultControllerActivator.Create(RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType) +182
   System.Web.Mvc.DefaultControllerFactory.GetControllerInstance(RequestContext requestContext, Type controllerType) +80
   System.Web.Mvc.DefaultControllerFactory.CreateController(RequestContext requestContext, String controllerName) +74
   System.Web.Mvc.MvcHandler.ProcessRequestInit(HttpContextBase httpContext, IController& controller, IControllerFactory& factory) +232
   System.Web.Mvc.<>c__DisplayClass6.<BeginProcessRequest>b__2() +49
   System.Web.Mvc.<>c__DisplayClassb`1.<ProcessInApplicationTrust>b__a() +13
   System.Web.Mvc.SecurityUtil.<GetCallInAppTrustThunk>b__0(Action f) +7
   System.Web.Mvc.SecurityUtil.ProcessInApplicationTrust(Action action) +22
   System.Web.Mvc.SecurityUtil.ProcessInApplicationTrust(Func`1 func) +124
   System.Web.Mvc.MvcHandler.BeginProcessRequest(HttpContextBase httpContext, AsyncCallback callback, Object state) +98
   System.Web.Mvc.MvcHandler.BeginProcessRequest(HttpContext httpContext, AsyncCallback callback, Object state) +50
   System.Web.Mvc.MvcHandler.System.Web.IHttpAsyncHandler.BeginProcessRequest(HttpContext context, AsyncCallback cb, Object extraData) +16
   System.Web.CallHandlerExecutionStep.System.Web.HttpApplication.IExecutionStep.Execute() +8963444
   System.Web.HttpApplication.ExecuteStep(IExecutionStep step, Boolean& completedSynchronously) +184
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This caused my issue: My dependency resolver was unable to construct my controller because of an exception. It was swallowed by the resolver, returned null and the MVC framework switched to the default controller activator resulting in the error described. –  Beriz Aug 29 '12 at 13:33
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You can get this exception at many different places in the MVC framework (e.g. it can't create the controller, or it can't create a model to give that controller).

The only easy way I've found to diagnose this problem is to override MVC as close to the exception as possible with your own code. Then your code will break inside Visual Studio when this exception occurs, and you can read the Type causing the problem from the stack trace.

This seems like a horrible way to approach this problem, but it's very fast, and very consistent.

For example, if this error is occurring inside the MVC DefaultModelBinder (which you will know by checking the stack trace), then replace the DefaultModelBinder with this code:

public class MyDefaultModelBinder : System.Web.Mvc.DefaultModelBinder
{
    protected override object CreateModel(System.Web.Mvc.ControllerContext controllerContext, System.Web.Mvc.ModelBindingContext bindingContext, Type modelType)
    {
        return base.CreateModel(controllerContext, bindingContext, modelType);
    }
}

And update your Global.asax.cs:

public class MvcApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication
{
...
    protected void Application_Start(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ModelBinders.Binders.DefaultBinder = new MyDefaultModelBinder();
    }
}

Now the next time you get that exception, Visual Studio will stop inside your MyDefaultModelBinder class, and you can check the "modelType" property to see what type caused the problem.

The example above works for when you get the "No parameterless constructor defined for this object" exception during model binding, only. But similar code can be written for other extension points in MVC (e.g. controller construction).

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That's what I was thinking of doing for my problem. –  Mr. Manager May 1 '13 at 23:24
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First video on http://tekpub.com/conferences/mvcconf

47:10 minutes in show the error and shows how to override the default ControllerFactory. I.e. to create structure map controller factory.

Basically, you are probably trying to implement dependency injection??

The problem is that is the interface dependency.

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And you can get the StructureMapControllerFactory class from MVC Storefront project –  goths Mar 2 '11 at 13:10
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I got the same error when:

Using a custom ModelView, both Actions (GET and POST) were passing the ModelView that contained two objects:

public ActionResult Add(int? categoryID)
{
    ...
    ProductViewModel productViewModel = new ProductViewModel(
            product,
            rootCategories
            );
    return View(productViewModel); 
}

And the POST also accepting the same model view:

[HttpPost]
[ValidateInput(false)]
public ActionResult Add(ProductModelView productModelView)
{...}

Problem was the View received the ModelView (needed both product and list of categories info), but after submitted was returning only the Product object, but as the POST Add expected a ProductModelView it passed a NULL but then the ProductModelView only constructor needed two parameters(Product, RootCategories), then it tried to find another constructor with no parameters for this NULL case then fails with "no parameterles..."

So, fixing the POST Add as follows correct the problem:

[HttpPost]
[ValidateInput(false)]
public ActionResult Add(Product product)
{...}

Hope this can help somebody (I spent almost half day to find this out!).

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Nestor, this is enlightening and seems correct. But why is the View returning a different object then it is receiving, i.e. a Product object and not the ProductViewModel? –  GilShalit Nov 24 '10 at 14:06
    
Oh, this was specific for my case, as I only need keep data for Products, the RootCategories was passed to the view only to print out, no input was done on it, so their values (RootCategories) were not kept in the <input> or anywhere else. Shall I need keep same ViewModel I would persist using the form <input>, the view data or something else. –  Nestor Nov 26 '10 at 8:25
    
GilShalit, today I found an answer (sorry Im slow!), looking at HTML rendered I saw the input take the name of [ObjectName].[Property], but there is not trace of original ViewModel, so you can only retrieve each individual object inside the ViewModel, but not the complete ViewModel itself. Example:, if your ProductViewModel vm has inside objects Product p and Category c, then your GET controller sends one model vm to the View, then you POST controller can only accept parameters like (Product p, Category c), but not the vm... if I'm wrong would appreciate some feedback. –  Nestor Nov 30 '10 at 11:45
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The same for me. My problem appeared because i forgot that my base model class already has property with the name which was defined in the view.

public class CTX : DbContext {  // context with domain models
    public DbSet<Products> Products { get; set; }  // "Products" is the source property
    public CTX() : base("Entities") {}
}

public class BaseModel : CTX { ... }
public class ProductModel : BaseModel { ... }
public class OrderIndexModel : OrderModel  { ... }

... and controller processing model :

[HttpPost]
[ValidateInput(false)]
public ActionResult Index(OrderIndexModel order) { ... }

Nothing special, right? But then i define the view ...

<div class="dataItem">
    <%=Html.Label("Products")%>
    <%=Html.Hidden("Products", Model.index)%>   // I FORGOT THAT I ALREADY HAVE PROPERTY CALLED "Products"
    <%=Html.DropDownList("ProductList", Model.products)%>
    <%=Html.ActionLink("Delete", "D")%>
</div>

... which causes "Parameterless constructor" error on POST request.

Hope that helps.

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I had a similar problem, and basically the point is that there are some arguments in the action method that were not supplied by the Model Binding process, (and in other words these fields were not submitted by the submitting page).

This problem will come up even if all arguments but one are supplied, and even if the one missing is a nullable type.

The problem might also be a result of a typo, in which the name of the argument and name of the form field will not be identical.

The solution is to 1) verify that the names match up 2) provide a default value for the argument 3) or provide another action method without this argument.

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Thanks @yo hal, your answer turned out to be the one that solved my particular instance of this error. The error message the framework spits out happens to be the least useful error message ever in this instance. –  Scott A. Lawrence Oct 1 '12 at 15:06
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I had this problem as well and thought I'd share since I can't find my problem above.

This was my code

return RedirectToAction("Overview", model.Id);

Calling this ActionResult:

public ActionResult Overview(int id)

I assumed it would be smart enough to figure out that the value I pass it is the id paramter for Overview, but it's not. This fixed it:

return RedirectToAction("Overview", new {id = model.Id});

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I had the same problem...

If your using a interface to decouple your connection against your DbContext (like me) you can use structuremap.mvc (3 or 4 - nudget package) to be able to use a constructure in your controller class. This will give you a DependencyResolution folder. Just change the commented line with your For< InterfaceClass >() and to Use< DbContextClass >().

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I got the same error, the culprit in my case was the constructor which was neither public nor private.

No parameterless constructor defined for this object.

Exception Details: System.MissingMethodException: No parameterless constructor defined for this object.

Repro code: Make sure the constructor has public before it.

public class Chuchi()
{
     Chuchi()    // The problem is this line. Public is missing
     {
         // initialization
         name="Tom Hanks";
     }

    public string name
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}
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I got same exception due to there was no parameterless public contructor

Code was like this:

public class HomeController : Controller
{        
    private HomeController()
    {
        _repo = new Repository();
    }

changed to

 public class HomeController : Controller
{        
    public HomeController()
    {
        _repo = new Repository();
    }

problem resolved to me.

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While this may be obvious to some, the culprit of this error for me was my MVC method was binding to a model that contained a property of type Tuple<>. Tuple<> has no parameterless constructor.

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