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Say we have the lexicographicaly integers 3,5,6,9,10,12 or 0011,0101,0110,1001,1010,1100 Each with two bits set.

What I want is to find the distance(how many lexicographical permutations between them, without doing the actuall permutations) between say 3 and 5 using as few operations as possible.

The distance table is as following

3->5  = 1 or 0011->0101 = 0001
3->6  = 2 or 0011->0110 = 0010
3->9  = 3 or 0011->1001 = 0011
3->10 = 4 or 0011->1010 = 0100
3->12 = 5 or 0011->1100 = 0101

So a function f(3,5) would return 1;

The function will always take arguments of same Hamming weight (same amount of set bits).

No arrays should be used.

Any idea would be great.

Edit

Forgot to mention, for any set bit size(the hamming weight) I will always use the first lexicographical permutation(base) as the first argument.

E.g.

hamming weight 1 base = 1
hamming weight 2 base = 3
hamming weight 3 base = 7
...

Edit 2

The solution should work for any hamming weight, sorry I was not specific enough.

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Should not 3->5 be 2? –  dreamcrash Nov 25 '12 at 19:45
    
No, lexicographicaly 5 comes after 3 with two bits set. –  1-----1 Nov 25 '12 at 19:47
2  
You forgot the number 10 (1010). –  Alexey Feldgendler Nov 25 '12 at 19:49
1  
@ks6g10 Hamming is with 2 ms I can't edit your post so fix it, thanks! –  Alberto Bonsanto Nov 25 '12 at 19:50
    
May the bit-length (4 in your examples) be assumed fix by the algorithm (this would make set-bit-counting algorithms faster)? What is the desired result for f(5,3)? –  Levente Pánczél Nov 25 '12 at 20:01
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Having a number
x = 2k1+2k2+...+2km
where k1<k2<...<km
it could be claimed that position of number x in lexicographically ordered sequence of all numbers with the same hamming weight is
lex_order(x) = C(k1,1)+C(k2,2)+...+C(km,m)
where C(n,m) = n!/m!/(n-m)! or 0 if m>n

Example:

3 = 20 + 21
lex_order(3) = C(0,1)+C(1,2) = 0+0 = 0

5 = 20 + 22
lex_order(5) = C(0,1)+C(2,2) = 0+1 = 1

6 = 21 + 22
lex_order(6) = C(1,1)+C(2,2) = 1+1 = 2

9 = 20 + 23
lex_order(9) = C(0,1)+C(3,2) = 0+3 = 3

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This is pretty cool! –  ypercube Nov 25 '12 at 21:16
    
Would love to use this but, when m is 20 - 30, unfeasible to sort of calculate. –  1-----1 Nov 25 '12 at 22:32
    
@ks6g10 - All C(n,m) values for 1<n,m<32 should be calculated using recurrence relation C(n+1,m+1)=C(n,m)+C(n,m+1) and stored in an array prior to running the main function. It will cost you just about 1000 additions. Factorial calculation is not actually required. –  Egor Skriptunoff Nov 25 '12 at 23:17
    
@EgorSkriptunoff Then it comes to that I can not really use arrays. –  1-----1 Nov 25 '12 at 23:44
    
@ks6g10 - What constraints are there on your program? Are input number values limited by some constant? What amount of ROM size, RAM size and CPU time do you have at your disposal? My solution can be enhanced to require only O(log(x)) memory and O(log^2(x)) time for calculating lex_order(x). –  Egor Skriptunoff Nov 26 '12 at 3:33
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If a and b are the positions of the two set bits, with zero being the least significant position, and a always being greater than b, then you can calculate:

n = a*(a-1)/2 + b

and the distance between two values is the difference between the two n values.

Example:

3->12:
  3:  a1=1, b1=0, n1=0
  12: a2=3, b2=2, n2=5
  answer: n2-n1 = 5

To extend this to other hamming weights, you can use this formula:

n = sum{i=1..m}(factorial(position[i])/(factorial(i)*factorial(position[i]-i)))

where m is the hamming weight, and position[i] is the position of the i'th set bit, counting from the least significant bit, with the least significant set bit's position being position[1].

share|improve this answer
    
Should the i* actually be factorial(i)*? –  Peter de Rivaz Nov 25 '12 at 22:11
    
@PeterdeRivaz: yes, thanks –  Vaughn Cato Nov 26 '12 at 14:59
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