Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Write a C function, sprod (n,x,y), that returns the scalar product of 2 1-D arrays of type float. The function takes as input variables the size n (type int variable) of the arrays and pointers x and y to the first member of each array, and returns a float result. The main() code block needs to call sprod to compute the matrix product a*b where the type float matrix a and type float vector b given by b=[1 1 1] and a=[1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9] (where a is a 3x3 matrix).

We can initialize b in a f(;;) loop and a in a double for(;;) loop (or use a lot of assignment statements). The matrix product should be computed by using calls to the function sprod to form the scalar products of each of the rows of a with the vector b; pointers to these rows are given by a[1], a[2], and a[3]. Lastly, a for(;;) loop to sum the resulting scalar products and the printf() function to print the result to the screen should also be used.

The result should be the sum of all of the elements of the matrix a. Copies of the matrix a and vector b should also be printed. We are to use the Numerical Recipes C functions matrix() and vector() with free_matrix() and free_vector() to create a and b as dynamically defined arrays.

I am a beginner when it comes to programming and I have found that I really suck at it. This is what I have so far and it blows up like crazy when it is compiled (I know some things have been left out). I tried using gdb to debug it, but I couldn't get that to work either. Any help would be appreciated.

# include <stdio.h>
# include "nrutil.h"
# include "nrutil.c"

void transp(float **a,int n);
float sprod(int n, float *x, float *y);
int main()
{
  int i,j;
  float var=0.0, sum=0.0, pro=0.0;
  float*b, **a;
  int n=3;
  float index;
  b=vector(0,n-1);
  a=matrix(0,n-1,0,n-1);

  printf("\nVector b\n");
  for(j=0;j<n;j++)
  {
    b[j]=1;
    printf("%.2f\n",b[j]);
  }
  for(i=0;i<n;i++)
  {
    for(j=0;j<n;j++);
    {
      var=var+1;
      a[i][j]=var;
    }
  }
  printf("\n Matrix a\n");
  for(i=0;i<n;i++);
  {
    for(j=0;j<n;j++);
    {
      printf("%.2lf",a[i][j]);
    }
    printf("\n");
  }
  printf("\nProduct of Matrix a and Vector b\n");

  for(i=0;i<n;i++);
  {
    pro=sprod(n,a[i],b);
    printf("%.2f\n",pro);
    sum+=pro;
  }
  printf("\n Sum of Product array\n");
  printf("%.2f\n\n", sum);
  free_ivector(index,0,n-1);
  free_matrix(a,0,n-1,0,n-1);

  return 0;
}

float sprod(int n, float *x, float *y)
{
  float scalar=0.0;
  int j=0;
  int sum=0;

  for(j=0;j<n;j++);
  {
    scalar+=x[j]*y[j];
  }
  return scalar;
 }

I have refined my code since originally posting this. Now it almost works I am just having trouble with line 50 the free_ivector bit of code. The terminal tells me: incompatible type for argument 1 of ‘free_ivector’. I'm not really sure what that means. The code takes the overall formatting of what David Duncan suggested in the first answer below.

share|improve this question
    
1. Where are your prototypes? 2. You have a closing curly brace in the codeline 11 and you didn't fill a[3,3] with anything? 3. for lops without any arguments? try to help us to understand your code improving it a bit more! :) –  Alberto Bonsanto Nov 25 '12 at 21:05
1  
this compiles ? –  paddy Nov 25 '12 at 21:13
    
@AlbertoBonsanto: the homework tag is not to be used. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 25 '12 at 21:19
    
@JonathanLeffler Thanks, I won't use it anymore, but it looks like a homework. –  Alberto Bonsanto Nov 25 '12 at 21:21
    
@AlbertoBonsanto: Agreed, but The homework tag is now officially deprecated. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 25 '12 at 21:22
show 6 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is a bit of a hard problem for someone uncomfortable with programming or even just C, since it involves pointers and passing array references. I think you know enough to look up examples of each specific item you need, though, and so your first goal--as you probably know--is to break things down into subproblems and tackle them individually (and iteratively, if need be). Since your current code could use a little help with the layout, I've adapted the problem statement into something you can tackle piece-by-piece. Replace each "TODO" comment with code that does that and I believe you'll be done.

#include <stdio.h>
#include "nrutil.h"

float sprod(int n, float *x, float *y)
{
    float result = 0.0;
    // TODO: Calculate result (hint: for loop repeating n times,
    // and each iteration you'll update result)

    return result;
}

int main()
{
    // TODO: Create and initialize matrix A
    // TODO: Create and initialize matrix B
    // TODO: Print A and B
    // TODO: For each row of A, call sprod() with that row of A
    // and B as inputs, and save each sprod() result
    // TODO: Sum the results
    // TODO: Print the sum

    return 0; // (0 indicates success; if you were to have
              //  failure cases, you could return other values)
}

Using the above approach also will facilitate compiling as you go (and consequently, being able to use the debugger). An absolute bare minimum for using GDB is the following:

  • Compile with the GCC -g switch--i.e., gcc -g myprog.c
  • gdb <program name> (program name will typically be a.exe and or a.out by default)
  • break <line number> to set a breakpoint
  • run to start the program
  • n for the next statement
  • quit to quit

Also, there are also a couple of things in the original problem statement that I see as a bit confusing if it were provided by the teacher (if it's just your paraphrasing things, I'm nitpicking):

  • for(;;) results in an infinite loop, unless within it you use a goto statement (very atypical) or a break statement (somewhat atypical), neither of which would be appropriate here. So it would have made a bit more sense to just say "for loop".
  • Just to be clear, C has zero-based indexing, meaning unless matrix() explicitly defines it as such, your rows would be a[0], a[1], and a[2] (not a[1], a[2], and a[3]).
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. That makes it a lot easier to understand what needs to be done. –  Sprock Nov 26 '12 at 0:32
add comment

To give an idea:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#define ROW 3
#define MAT 9

float printinv( int n, float * a, float * b );

int main ( void ){
    int i, k;
    float a[ ROW ] = { 1, 2, 3 };
    float b[ MAT ] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
    float *c;
    c = &b[0];


    printf( "A = " );
    for( i = 0; i < ROW; i++ ){
        if( i == 0 )
            printf( "[" );
        if ( i != ROW - 1 )
            printf( "  %5.2f", a[ i ] );
        else {
            printf( "  %5.2f", a[ i ] );
            printf( "  ]" );
        }
    }

    printf( "    B = " );
    for( i = k = 0; k < MAT; k++ ){
        if( i == 0 && k == 0) 
            printf("[");
        else if( i == 0 && k > 0 )
            printf( "                                     [");
        if( i != ROW - 1 ){
            printf( "  %5.2f", b[ k ] );
            i++;
        }
        else{
            printf( "  %5.2f", b[ k ] );
            printf( "  ]\n" );
            i = 0;
        }
    }

    printf( "C = " );
    for( i = 0; i < ROW; i++ ){
        if( i == 0 ) 
            printf("[");
        if( i != ROW - 1 )
            printf( "  %5.2f", printinv( MAT, ( c + i ), a ) );
        else{
            printf( "  %5.2f", printinv( MAT, ( c + i ), a ) );
            printf( "  ]\n" );
        }
    }
    getchar();

}

float printinv( int n, float * b, float * a )
{
    int i, k;
    float result;
    float x, y;

    for( result = i = 0; i < ROW; i++ ){
        k = i * ROW;
        result += b[ k ] * a[ i ];
        x = b[ k ]; 
        y = a[ i ];
    }
    return result;
}

Output:

Output

share|improve this answer
    
-What does this code do? Is this an example of how to take the scalar product? Also what does the printinv do? –  Sprock Nov 27 '12 at 1:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.