Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following snippet:

var prevPageWrap = data.prevPage.jqmData("wrapper"),
    pageBackBtn = page.closest('div:jqmData(wrapper="true")').jqmData("usebackbtn"),
    useBackBtn =  pageBackBtn || o.useBackBtn;

if ( useBackBtn && !prevPageWrap ){
    self.crumble(event, data, page );
    }   

My problem is useBackBtn. Im setting usebackbtn to false in my HTML element like so:

<div data-role="page" id="landing" data-wrapper="true" data-scrollmode="overthrow" data-usebackbtn="false">

</div>

which I'm also able to retrieve.

Still

useBackBtn =  pageBackBtn || o.useBackBtn;

is set to true, although pageBackBtn is false.

Question:
If the first "option" is false and the second option is true, what will be the value of useBackBtn = What supercedes what? Is there a shorthand syntax way to say "if the first option is defined, take it, otherwise try the 2nd option?"

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
You need to be aware that you are probably getting the string 'false' which evaluates to true. –  JoshRagem Nov 25 '12 at 21:07
    
good point! Thanks. –  frequent Nov 25 '12 at 21:09
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the first "option" is false and the second option is true, what will be the value of useBackBtn = What supercedes what?

The second option.

a || b evaluates as a if a is a true value, otherwise it evaluates as b.

Is there a shorthand syntax way to say "if the first option is defined, take it, otherwise try the 2nd option?"

Use a ternary operator.

var a, b, result;
a = 0;
b = 1;
result = typeof a !== "undefined" ? a : b
alert(result)
share|improve this answer
    
ok. thanks for clarification –  frequent Nov 25 '12 at 21:06
1  
Technically, || is the lazy logical or operator in JavaScript. It only evaluates the second operand if it has to, because the first argument is falsy. Note that I don't say false because JavaScript has some quite unusual notions of truthiness or falsiness, where empty string, null, and 0, as well as false are all falsy. This wierdness leads to the convention in JavaScript of x || y meaning use x as a default, and y if x isn't there. In my opinion, poor language design, but that is the way it is. –  SAJ14SAJ Nov 25 '12 at 21:08
3  
@SAJ14SAJ: FWIW, these values are "falsy" in other languages as well. The "lazy" evaluation of the OR operator is called short-circuit evaluation: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation. –  Felix Kling Nov 25 '12 at 21:09
2  
@SAJ14SAJ: I agree. What I wanted to say with this is that it seems to be less weird if you are used to other languages as well. It's just a matter of perspective. I would be utterly confused if if(0) would evaluate to true ;) –  Felix Kling Nov 25 '12 at 21:15
1  
@FelixKling I still bear the scars of C where we used small ints for booleans, and chars, ints, booleans, and pointers were practically indistinguishable. I like my types firmly knowing what they are--which is not to say I don't love dynamic typing (oh, I do, I do), I just want my dynamic types to know well who they are. :-) I agree if (0) should not be true, but I think it should be an error. –  SAJ14SAJ Nov 25 '12 at 21:19
show 6 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.