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2 Questions:

  1. I'm writing a function to prepend a node to a list. Currently I have it like this:

    void addList( NODE_TYPE** head, NODE_TYPE** d_name )
    {
        (*d_name)->next = *head;
        *head = *d_name;
    }
    

    and inside main(), I call it like this:

    addList( &head, &node_3);
    

    My question is, is there another way to do this with a function prototype such as:

    void addList( NODE *head, NODE *node);
    

    ?

    This was a class problem, and I don't understand how prepending can be done with the above function prototype since calling the function would only pass in the value of the address, the caller would be unable to see any changes made to the head nor the node.

  2. I'm unsure if my deleteList function is right. I want it so that the temp points to where head (anchor) points to. Then the next_free points to the 2nd node linked with the head. Then I free the first node. Then repeat for the second, third and so on, until all of them are freed.

    void deleteList( NODE_TYPE** head )
    {
        NODE_TYPE* temp = *head;
        NODE_TYPE* next_free = NULL;
    
        while ( temp->next != NULL )
        {
            next_free = temp->next;
            free( temp );
            temp = next_free;
        }
    
        *head = NULL;
    }
    

Is this the correct approach?

share|improve this question

To answer number 1, you can use what's called a dummy head. That is an empty node whose next pointer points to the first element in your list. So you create your empty list as a single node, and then pass that node around knowing that its pointer won't change. This is useful if you intend to store pointers to the head of your list in multiple places but allow the list to change.

For number 2, it's almost right, but you want to make sure that *head is not NULL initially. Also, it won't delete a list containing only one element. Do this instead:

while ( temp != NULL )

And leave everything else the same.

Oh, another note about your first question. You are wrong when you say this:

calling the function would only pass in the value of the address, the caller would be unable to see any changes made to the head nor the node.

The contents of the node can change. You don't need a double pointer to it. The double pointer means the pointer can change.

share|improve this answer

You can avoid the extra "next_free" variable by directly assigning to *head:

void deleteList( NODE_TYPE **head )
{
    NODE_TYPE *temp;

    while ( (temp = *head) )
    {
        *head = temp->next;
        free( temp );
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
This generally results in more instructions because the head pointer must be dereferenced each time. I believe this would not be the case if the pointer was declared with the restrict keyword. This is just a general point, but would not be significant here because calling free is a much lengthier operation. – paddy Nov 25 '12 at 22:17
    
Formally you are right, but I don't care about performance (the whole thing would be in cache anyway). Smaller code := {easyer reading, fewer chances for bugs} – wildplasser Nov 25 '12 at 22:21
    
I agree. Was just nit-picking =) – paddy Nov 25 '12 at 22:26

"My question is, is there another way to do this with a function prototype such as: void addList( NODE *head, NODE *node)"

Well you are right. If you just "pass by value" the changes you reflect will not apply to the original subroutine. What you can do is this:

Node_type * addList(Node_type *head, Node_type *d_name)
{
d_name->next=head;
return d_name;
}

In the caller function call in this format

 head = addList( head, node_3);

This would reflect the change you want to see

For Q2

Just put the condition

while(temp!=NULL)

This would take care of the condition where there is an empty list or a list with single node

share|improve this answer

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