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Just wondering why this is not working?

this is my awk code, converting "hh:mm:ss" format to seconds

  a.awk 
  3 BEGIN {                                                                         
  4     FS=":";                                                                     
  5 }                                                                               
  6                                                                                 
  7 {                                                                               
  8     retval = 0;                                                                 
  9     for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) {                                                 
 10         retval += $i * 60 ** (NF-i);                                            
 11     }                                                                           
 12     print $retval;                                                                
 13 }                                                                               
 14                                                              

 input.txt
 59:22:40

 $ cat input.txt  | awk -f a.awk 
    //<empty>
 $

however, I try it on command line:

 $ echo "00:59:30" | awk 'BEGIN { FS=":" } { retval = 0; for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) {  retval += $i * 60 ** (NF-i); } print retval;}'                 
 3570

what's wrong with a.awk ?


update just for clarifcation

$ awk --version
GNU Awk 4.0.1
Copyright (C) 1989, 1991-2012 Free Software Foundation.
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2  
Useless use of cat: awk -f a.awk < input.txt saves spawning a process. –  dmckee Nov 25 '12 at 21:26
    
I don't see anything just looking at it, but I have two questions: (1) Why does your dump of a.awk start at line 3? (and I assume that those line number are a decoration for this post and not in the file itself, right?) and (2) does the command-line version work right if you send input from input.txt? –  dmckee Nov 25 '12 at 21:30
    
@dmckee try < input.txt still the same thing, no result... for you question 1), yes, those line number is just for decoration. 2) yes, command line version works, which is 213760 –  lightmanhk Nov 25 '12 at 21:48
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

That for loop is cute, but this seems more direct and easier to understand.

BEGIN {
    FS=":";
}

{
    retval = 0;
    in_hours = $1
    in_minutes = $2;
    in_seconds = $3;
    retval = (in_hours * 3600) + (in_minutes * 60) + in_seconds
    print retval;
}

I think the problem with your loop is in the exponentiation. My version, at least, doesn't support any ** operator. This might work better for you. Also, be careful with your dollar signs. You need them for fields; you don't need them for variables.

for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) {
    retval += i * (60^(NF-i));
}
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1  
I found gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/html_node/Arithmetic-Ops.html, ** and ^ is the same thing. Thanks, I found the problem.... it was a typo... should return retval; not return $retval; –  lightmanhk Nov 25 '12 at 22:02
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Since your question has already been answered by the other 2 posts, here's something cute you can do with date to accomplish the same conversion from hh:mm:ss to time in seconds:

# GNU date

string_time="01:01:01"
string_time_in_seconds=$(date -u -d "1970-01-01 ${string_time}" +"%s")
echo ${string_time_in_seconds}

3661
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it was a typo

   a.awk 
    3 BEGIN {                                                                         
    4     FS=":";                                                                     
    5 }                                                                               
    6                                                                                 
    7 {                                                                               
    8     retval = 0;                                                                 
    9     for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) {                                                 
   10         retval += $i * 60 ** (NF-i);                                            
   11     }                                                                           
   12     print retval;          ///<<<< notice here.                                                         
   13 }                                                                               
   14          
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Or, using bash only:

IFS=: read -a a < input.txt
((retval=${a[0]}*3600+${a[1]}*60+${a[2]}))
echo "$retval"
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