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I use MySQL Workbench to run queries. It takes literally no time at all to run them. However, when I connect to the database via PDO, it takes over one second to connect! Why?

<?php

$host = "localhost";
$db = "localhost";
$user = "root";
$pass = "";

$mtime = explode(" ",microtime());
$starttime = $mtime[1] + $mtime[0];

$conn = new PDO("mysql:host=$host;dbname=$db",$user,$pass);

$mtime = explode(" ",microtime());
$totaltime = (($mtime[1] + $mtime[0]) - $starttime);
echo $totaltime * 1000;

This outputs:

1008.975982666
share|improve this question
    
Is workbench connecting via localhost or 127.0.0.1 or some other name? Connection speed issues are often related to DNS lookup issues. If you have a shell (and this is a Unix-like machine, does dig localhost return quickly? localhost should be defined as 127.0.0.1 but there could be something weird with the hosts file. –  Michael Berkowski Nov 25 '12 at 21:30
1  
Call microtime(true) to get a float value of the current time, and get rid of this whole explode-time-calculation-thingie. –  Sven Nov 25 '12 at 21:30
    
@MichaelBerkowski I'm going to try that! –  Student of Hogwarts Nov 25 '12 at 21:31
    
@Sven Just copy-pasted from the internet.. –  Student of Hogwarts Nov 25 '12 at 21:31
1  
A database named "localhost" sounds strange to me. Are you sure this is right. –  Sven Nov 25 '12 at 21:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

On windows vista and newer use 127.0.0.1 instead of localhost.

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Great! It worked! Why is that? When I enter localhost, it doesn't take 1 second to load? Is the browser caching the DNS? –  Student of Hogwarts Nov 25 '12 at 21:32
1  
@StudentofHogwarts: See stackoverflow.com/questions/3715925/localhost-vs-127-0-0-1 –  aam1r Nov 25 '12 at 21:33
    
Not really sure, but I remember reading that windows first tries IPv6 address (:::1) for localhost and then 127.0.0.1 if it fails. –  dev-null-dweller Nov 25 '12 at 21:37
    
@dev-null-dweller That makes sense. Thanks! –  Student of Hogwarts Nov 25 '12 at 21:39

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