Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible copy from 1D array to 3D with some function as memcpy?

Now I am using a slow method :

for(int loop1 = 0; loop1 < numberAgents; loop1++)
    for(int loop2 = 0; loop2 < fieldWidth; loop2++)
        for(int loop3 = 0; loop3 < fieldWidth; loop3++)
            potentialField[loop1][loop2][loop3] = cpuPotentialField[loop1 * fieldWidth * fieldWidth + loop2 * fieldWidth + loop3];

This doesn't work :

memPotentialField = numberAgents * fieldWidth * fieldWidth * sizeof(float);
memcpy(potentialField, cpuPotentialField, memPotentialField);
share|improve this question
3  
What makes you think your first (working) method is "slow" ? –  Paul R Nov 25 '12 at 22:11
2  
Did you profile it? –  Axel Gneiting Nov 25 '12 at 22:20
    
Your function may be fine, or inefficient, depending on the inner memory layout and size of your data. Could you provide details on potentialField and cpuPotentialField? Are they really plain simple arrays? –  didierc Nov 25 '12 at 22:23

3 Answers 3

Multi-dimensional arrays are stored row-wise (§ 8.3.4/9), so essentially your approach with memcpy is fine (because floats are PODs).

memcpy(&potentialField[0][0][0], cpuPotentialField,
       sizeof(potentialField)/sizeof(***potentialField));

Using std::copy is better, since it works for non-PODS too. So I would write

std::copy(&potentialField[0][0][0],
          &potentialField[0][0][0] + sizeof(potentialField)/sizeof(potentialField[0][0][0]),
          cpuPotentialField);
share|improve this answer

Unless you have a particularly bad compiler or you've forgotten to turn on optimisation (e.g. -O3) then the first method should be fine performance-wise. However you may be able to optimise it a little by hoisting some of the multiplies:

for (int loop1 = 0; loop1 < numberAgents; loop1++)
{
    const int index1 = loop1 * fieldWidth * fieldwidth;

    for (int loop2 = 0; loop2 < fieldWidth; loop2++)
    {
        const int index2 = index1 + loop2 * fieldWidth;

        for (int loop3 = 0; loop3 < fieldWidth; loop3++)
        {
            potentialField[loop1][loop2][loop3] = cpuPotentialField[index2 + loop3];
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You may be able to get some performance by unrolling the loop. In some processors, branch or jump instructions cause the instruction pipeline to be reloaded, wasting time.

//...
unsigned int items_remaining = fieldWidth;
for (unsigned int loop3 = 0; loop3 < fieldWidth; ++loop3)
{
    unsigned int copy_count = 4 - (items_remaining % 4);
    switch (copy_count)
    {
        // The fall-through of these cases is intentional.
        case 4:
          potentialField[loop1][loop2][loop3] = cpuPotentialField[loop1 * fieldWidth * fieldWidth + loop2 * fieldWidth + loop3];
          ++loop3;
          --items_remaining;
        case 3:
          potentialField[loop1][loop2][loop3] = cpuPotentialField[loop1 * fieldWidth * fieldWidth + loop2 * fieldWidth + loop3];
          ++loop3;
          --items_remaining;
        case 2:
          potentialField[loop1][loop2][loop3] = cpuPotentialField[loop1 * fieldWidth * fieldWidth + loop2 * fieldWidth + loop3];
          ++loop3;
          --items_remaining;
        case 1:
          potentialField[loop1][loop2][loop3] = cpuPotentialField[loop1 * fieldWidth * fieldWidth + loop2 * fieldWidth + loop3];
          ++loop3;
          --items_remaining;
    } // End: switch
} // End: for  

This is only unrolled for 4 items. The more items in the loop, the more efficient the loop. As Paul R said, precomputing some of the indices would also help.

Some processors may have specialized copy instructions that the compiler can take advantage of, depending on the compiler.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.