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Hi everybody I am attempting to reproduce merge sort in haskel, here is my code:

-- merge
merge :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [a] -> [a]
merge [] [] = []
merge xs [] = xs
merge [] ys = ys
merge (x:xs) (y:ys)
  | x <= y = x:(merge xs (y:ys))
  | otherwise = y:(merge (x:xs) ys)

-- split
splitIn2 :: (Ord a) => [a] -> ([a],[a])
splitIn2 [] = ([],[])
splitIn2 xs = splitAt ((length xs `div` 2)+1) xs

-- msort
msort :: (Ord a) => [a] -> [a]
msort [] = []
msort [x] = [x]
msort (xs) = merge (msort as) (msort bs)
    where (as,bs) = splitIn2 xs

It compiles on ghc, and it works for:

*Main> msort([])
[]
*Main> msort([1])
[1]

However it doesnt do its job properly because it starts too loop infinitely (at least this is what I thought) and it doesnt print anything.

I think it is because I dont remove elements from the lists like I did in other recursive experiment, any suggestion?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The problem is that when length xs == 2,

(length xs `div` 2) + 1
= (2 `div` 2) + 1
= 1 + 1
= 2

and splitAt 2 xs returns (xs, []). Since the first list is still of length 2, msort will try to splitIn2 it down again in an infinite loop.

To solve this, you can simply get rid of the +1; it's completely unnecessary. You can also eliminate the special case for the empty list, since splitAt 0 [] = ([], []).

splitIn2 xs = splitAt (length xs `div` 2) xs
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*Main> splitIn2 [1, 2, 3, 0, 5, 6]
([1,2,3,0],[5,6])

And after small change (deleting +1 ):

splitIn2 xs = splitAt ((length xs `div` 2)) xs

It works:

*Main> splitIn2 [1, 2, 3, 0, 5, 6]
([1,2,3],[0,5,6])
*Main> msort [1, 2, 3, 0, 5, 6]
[0,1,2,3,5,6]
share|improve this answer
    
Ok I dont understand why it is not working also with the +1, any explanation? –  haskellguy Nov 25 '12 at 22:52
    
@graphtheory92 The problem is with the 2-element list. And hammar explained this above. –  applicative_functor Nov 25 '12 at 22:57

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