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I have an anonymous class that needs to be initialized before the trait that it mixes in. Early initialization won't work because they don't allow one to use the 'this' reference. I can make it work if I declare the class as an inner trait with a self type, but this seems unnecessarily verbose, as the type is only used in one place in the code and is inuitive to be inlined as an anonymous class. However, I seem to find the syntax that scala will accept and meets the initialization order requirements that I have. Here is a simplified example without the extraneous detail (assume there are reasons I'm doing things this way).

trait WaitCondition[+T] {
...
}

trait EventWaitCondition[+T] extends WaitCondition[T] {
...
}

trait Event { outer =>
    private[this] var _cachedWaitCondition : Option[WaitCondition[T]]

    def next() : WaitCondition[T] =
        //Is there a way to "inline" the defintion of NextWaitCondition
        //without screwing up the initialization order?
        _cachedWaitCondition.getOrElse{ new NextWaitCondition with EventWaitCondition[T] }

    private[this] trait NextWaitCondition { this : WaitCondition[T] =>
        outer._cache = Some(this)
        ....
    }
    ....
}

So, basically, my question is that is there a way to inline the definition of NextWaitCondition as an anonymous type without changing the initialization order between NextWaitCondition and WaitCondition (i.e., so that NextWaitCondition still initializes first)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Short answer: of course not.

We must take your word that there is just cause for the bending the laws of init order. Ponder for a moment the souls who respect the law but still suffer under it.

@xiefei's answer is not kludgy; it's sufficiently structured to effect the kludge you seek.

There is talk about deprecating DelayedInit in favor of a postConstructor hook; but you're really asking for a preConstructor hook, so why not just formalize that with a template method?

And depending on the dependency between your Foo and SubFoo, this could be a matter of preferring composition to inheritance. Then there are no games with init order.

In the following, Firstly generalizes your named solution with a template method. It has the advantage that only the use site knows or cares about it.

trait Second {
  println("I must happen after first.")
}
trait SecondDelayed extends DelayedInit {
  println("SecondDelayed neutral stuff")
  def delayedInit(body: =>Unit) {
    body // body first
    println("I must be delayed after first.")
  }
}
trait Firstly {
  def firstly
  firstly
}

object Test extends App {
  def trial(t: =>Unit) {
    println("----")
    t
  }
  // candidate for least obnoxious
  trial {
    new Firstly with Second {
      def firstly {
        println("Do this firstly.")
      }
      println("Don't care when this happens.")
    }
  }
  trial {
    // current solution
    new Something with Second
    trait Something { this: Second =>
      println("First code.")
    }
  }
  trial {
    // prefer anon
    new Second {
      println("Anon first?") // nope
    }
  }
  trial {
    // DelayedInit solution
    new SecondDelayed {
      println("Anon first, then other delayed.")
    }
  }
  trial {
    // the "delayed" code must be idempotent,
    // or find a useful way to trigger execution;
    // here, the delayed code happens twice.
    class Foo extends SecondDelayed {
      println("Foo wants init, too")
    }
    new Foo {
      println("Anon first, then other delayed.")
    }
  }
  /* early defs are only for defs, with no this
  new {
    println("Anon first.")
  } with Second
  */
  trial {
    // trait code doesn't participate
    new DelayedInit with Second {
      def delayedInit(body: =>Unit) {
        println("My crucial early init business")
        body
      }
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, a postConstructor hook would be the ideal solution in my case, since the reason for this order-dependency is that EventWaitCondition is doing something that really should be done after the object is fully initialized. But, without such postConstruction hook I have to put it in EventWaitCondition's initializer. In most cases, this still works out okay, but the case cited above it caused problems. –  Nimrand Nov 27 '12 at 23:35
    
Also, I don't know why what I'm asking for is unreasonable. I can already control initialization order between traits using the order in which the traits are listed, and I can define a type inline (what essentially is an inlined trait definition). But, as far as I can tell, I cannot do both at once, which seems to be a limitation of the syntax, not the concepts that underly the language. The purpose of my question is to simply confirm if I've missed something or not. In any case, I'll go over your examples so that I fully understand your suggestions. –  Nimrand Nov 27 '12 at 23:43
    
Upon doing further research, I think the fundamental problem I'm running into is that, though it's not 100% obvious from the syntax, when one defines an anonymous type one is essentially defining an anonymous 'class', not a trait, and a class is always initialized after traits (baring use of delayedInit). So, as in my example above, I have to define the trait as a named type, even if it's only ever used in the one line of code. I'm marking yours as the answer since it is so thurough. I do hope they create some sort of postConstructor hook in later scala. –  Nimrand Nov 28 '12 at 2:38
1  
The situation is described here: artima.com/pins1ed/abstract-members.html#20.5 which then goes on to talk about early definitions. One could say (as you did say) that your special case is that you want to leak an early reference to this. Scala has a habit of keeping you from doing things you shouldn't be doing even when you disagree. –  som-snytt Nov 28 '12 at 4:03
    
That restriction does make sense, and thanks for directing me to that post. What I was trying to say in my earlier comment is that I wouldn't have to leak the this reference "early" if the EventWaitCondition had a postConstruction hook it could use to execute some of its code after the object is fully initialized. Without that hook, I've put that code in the initializer, which, upon further reflection, is the real 'kludge' I think. But, I can't really 'fix' EventWaitCondition without adding a lot of complication to what is otherwise an elegant solution, so it's good enough, I suppose. –  Nimrand Nov 28 '12 at 15:02

Not sure this is what you want, but maybe the DelayedInit trait will help you.

trait WaitCondition[+T]

trait EventWaitCondition[+T] extends WaitCondition[T] with DelayedInit{
  def delayedInit(body: => Unit) = {
    body
    println("Initializing EventWaitCondition...")
  }
}

trait Event[T] { outer =>
  var _cachedWaitCondition: Option[WaitCondition[T]] = None
  var _cache: Option[WaitCondition[T]] = None

  def next(): WaitCondition[T] = _cachedWaitCondition.getOrElse(new EventWaitCondition[T] {
        println("Initializing NextWaitCondition...")
        outer._cache = Some(this)
      })
}

new Event[Int]{} next                           

//> Initializing NextWaitCondition...
//| Initializing EventWaitCondition...

The downside of this approach is that the initializing code put after body in delayedInit are always delayed.

share|improve this answer
    
That might work in a pinch, but isn't really what I'm looking for. In particular, changing EventWaitCondition to a DelayedInit trait is kludgy since most derived types don't need to be initialized this way (and in fact there might be problems with it). –  Nimrand Nov 26 '12 at 15:39
    
My reasoning is that you can define types anonymously, and you can control initialization order of traits by the order in which they are listed in the derivation list, so it would seem logical that you could do both at once, but so far I've been unable to come up with the proper syntax to do that (if it is indeed possible). –  Nimrand Nov 26 '12 at 16:01

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