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Im trying to figure out what this code is going:

SELECT EMP_ID, SUM(INV_PRICE) AS TOTAL_SALES
FROM INVOICE
GROUP BY EMP_ID
HAVING SUM(INV_PRICE) <= AVG(INV_PRICE);

I wrote it or it was recommend to be a while a ago and now im not sure if its doing what I originally wanted it to do.

What I wanted: I have an invoice table with price and employees. I wanted to get each employees total sales and compare that to the average total sales for all employees. From there I wanted the results to show me which employees were selling below average.

Is what I have above correct?

Here is what I get when I run <= average:

enter image description here

Here is what I get when I run > average:

enter image description here

I think my main concern is making sure that it's calculating the right average. Which is the average of the sum from each employee.

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What happens when you test it? Does it do what you want it to do? –  Ken White Nov 25 '12 at 23:24
    
I'll upload a picture of what I get for greater > and <=. It looks like its working, im just not sure if the results im getting are correct. –  Batman Nov 25 '12 at 23:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, it's not. The SUM(INV_PRICE) will give you the total sales of an employee but the AVG(INV_PRICE) will give you the average sale per employee, not the average (for all employees) of their total sales.

Try this of you want the average of total sales calculated for all employees - even those that have no sales at all:

SELECT EMP_ID, SUM(INV_PRICE) AS TOTAL_SALES
FROM INVOICE
GROUP BY EMP_ID
HAVING SUM(INV_PRICE) <= 
         ( SELECT SUM(INV_PRICE) FROM INVOICE )
       / ( SELECT COUNT(*) FROM EMPLOYEE )
  ; 

or this if you want the average of all employees that have sales:

SELECT EMP_ID, SUM(INV_PRICE) AS TOTAL_SALES
FROM INVOICE
GROUP BY EMP_ID
HAVING SUM(INV_PRICE) <= 
         ( SELECT SUM(INV_PRICE) / COUNT(DISTINCT EMP_ID) 
           FROM INVOICE )
  ; 

Skip that, Access has no COUNT(DISTINCT ):

SELECT EMP_ID, SUM(INV_PRICE) AS TOTAL_SALES
FROM INVOICE
GROUP BY EMP_ID
HAVING SUM(INV_PRICE) <=
         ( SELECT AVG(TOTAL_SALES)
           FROM
             ( SELECT SUM(INV_PRICE) AS TOTAL_SALES
               FROM INVOICE
               GROUP BY EMP_ID 
             ) tmp
         ) ; 
share|improve this answer
    
perfect, thank you. –  Batman Nov 26 '12 at 0:45

Is what I have above correct?

No. Your query is probably returning no records (only the ones with one sale). sum(inv_price) greater or equal that the avg(inv_price) for any given group most of the time.

You want to precalculate the average in another query.

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+1 Exactly. The average is for the group, not the table –  Bohemian Nov 25 '12 at 23:28

What you want is this:

SELECT EMP_ID, SUM(INV_PRICE) AS TOTAL_SALES
FROM INVOICE
GROUP BY EMP_ID
HAVING SUM(INV_PRICE) <= (
    SELECT AVG(INV_SUM)
    FROM (
        SELECT SUM(INV_PRICE) AS INV_SUM
        FROM INVOICE
        GROUP BY EMP_ID) x) ;

The average calculated here is over the all employees, whereas your calculates it over each group, which is non-sensical: the sum can't be more than the average for any given group.

share|improve this answer
    
The above gets the average from each individual invoice. What Im trying to get is how employees are doing in relation to each other. If you say its non-sensical, maybe I should reconsider what im trying to do :/ –  Batman Nov 25 '12 at 23:37
1  
@Bohemian: This is not what the OP wants. Consider this: All sales having INV_PRICE = 100 but some employees have done a lot of them while others only one. The (SELECT AVG(INV_PRICE) FROM INVOICE) you have will show 100, while of course the total sales of many employees is much more (and thus the average of the total sales per employee will be more than 100, too). –  ypercube Nov 25 '12 at 23:46
    
Thank you, that's exactly what im trying to do. –  Batman Nov 25 '12 at 23:53
1  
@ypercube got it. Check my answer now. Thx –  Bohemian Nov 26 '12 at 0:26
1  
@batman see edited answer –  Bohemian Nov 26 '12 at 0:27

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