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Currently a student in college, decided to jump ahead of my programming class and have a little fun with pointers. This is supposed to take a specific serial input and change the state of three LED's I have attached to the Teensy++2.0. However it seems to be just giving me back the first input.
http://arduino.cc/en/Serial/ReadBytesUntil
This is my reference for the ReadBytesUntil() The input goes #,#,### (1,1,255 being an example)
I guess basically my question is, does ReadBytesUntil() deal with commas? And if so, whats going on here?

EDIT -- I asked my teacher and even he has no clue why it doesn't work.

char *dataFinder(char *str){
  while (*str != ','){
    str++;
  }
  str++;
  return str;
}

void inputDecoder(){
  str = incomingText;
  whichLED = *str;
  dataFinder(str);
  onoff = *str;
  dataFinder(str);
  powerLevel = *str;
}



void loop(){
  int length;
  if (Serial.available() > 0 ){      //this is basically: if something is typed in, do       something.
length = Serial.readBytesUntil(13,incomingText, 10);  //reads what is typed in, and stores it in incomingVar
incomingText[length]=0;  ///swapping out cr with null 
inputDecoder();
//ledControl();
Serial.print("Entered:");
//incomingText[9]=0;
Serial.println(incomingText);  //Here for testing, to show what values I'm getting back.
Serial.println(whichLED);
Serial.println(onoff);
Serial.println(powerLevel);
}
  delay(1000);
}
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I apologize if this is really stupid. This is my first post here. –  Solidus Nov 26 '12 at 0:05
1  
What is the output? whichLED, onoff, and powerLevel should be "1,1,255", "1, 255", "255" respectively because dataFinder() is not NUL terminating any of the strings. EDIT: You are not using the return value from dataFinder() so str always has the same value in inputDecoder(), try doing str = dataFinder(str); –  SpacedMonkey Nov 26 '12 at 14:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The str in inputDecoder() is from the global scope and is not the same str in dataFinder(), which has local scope.

Imagine this ASCII picture is the layout of memory:

  str
+-----+-----+-----+-----+     +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|  *  |     |     |     | ... |  1  |  ,  |  1  |  ,  |  2  |  5  |  5  | \n  |
+--|--+-----+-----+-----+     +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
   | 
   |
   \-----------------------------^

When you pass str to dataFinder() it creates a copy of the pointer, which I'll call str'

  str         str'
+-----+-----+-----+-----+     +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|  *  |     |  *  |     | ... |  1  |  ,  |  1  |  ,  |  2  |  5  |  5  | \n  |
+--|--+-----+--|--+-----+     +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
   |           \-----------------^
   |
   \-----------------------------^

When dataFinder() increments str it is really altering str'

  str         str'
+-----+-----+-----+-----+     +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
|  *  |     |  *  |     | ... |  1  |  ,  |  1  |  ,  |  2  |  5  |  5  | \n  |
+--|--+-----+--|--+-----+     +-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+-----+
   |           \-----------------------------^
   |
   \-----------------------------^

Then, when you return to inputDecoder() you dereference str which is still pointing at the start of the string.

You can either assign the value of str' back to the global str using:

str = dataFinder(str);

or change dataFinder() so it does not take an argument, therefore not copying the variable.

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Awesome. This seems to fix it. It doesn't like my three digit code at the end, but I can make math to figure that out. Thanks a ton dude! –  Solidus Nov 27 '12 at 3:32

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