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I am having some problem with writing a function to extract strings from a file as part of a bigger program. Everything seems to be working fine, except when I use memset or bzero to erase the character arrays I have been using. I have been sitting with this problem for more than an hour and I keep getting seg faults whatever I do. I am getting this error for both bzero and memset. Please help me out. I am attaching my code below. The statement "Come out of addfront" is printed but none of the "Done with all bzero" statements are printing. I get a segmentation fault at that point. Thank you

void extractFileData(FILE *fp , char clientName[])
{
    char tempFileName[50], tempFilePath[100], tempFileSize[50];
    struct stat fileDetails;

    while(fgets(tempFileName, sizeof(tempFileName), fp)!= NULL)
    {
        if((newLinePos = strchr(tempFileName, '\n')) != NULL)
        {
            *newLinePos = '\0';
        }

        strcat(tempFilePath, "SharedFiles/");
        strcat(tempFilePath, tempFileName);

        if(stat(tempFilePath, &fileDetails) < 0)
        {
            perror("Stat error");
            exit(1);
        }

        //Copy it into a string
        sprintf(tempFileSize, "%zu", fileDetails.st_size);
        printf("temp file size: %s\n", tempFileSize);

        //Add all these details to the file list by creating a new node
        addFront(tempFileName, tempFileSize, clientName);

        printf("Come out of addfront\n");

        memset(&tempFileName, 0, 45);
        printf("Done with all bzero\n");
        memset(&tempFileSize, 0, sizeof(tempFileSize));
        memset(&tempFilePath, 0, sizeof(tempFilePath));

        printf("Done with all bzero\n");
    }
}   

EDIT:

void addFront(char fileName[], char fileSize[], char clientName[])
{
    FILENODE* n;
    printf("Inside add front function\n");
    strcpy(n->fileName, fileName);
    printf("n->filename: %s\n", n->fileName);
    strcpy(n->fileSize, fileSize);
    printf("n->filesize: %s\n", n->fileSize);
    strcpy(n->ownerName, clientName);
    printf("n->ownername: %s\n", n->ownerName);
    myFileList.head = n;
    printf("Did it go past myfilelist head = n\n");
    myFileList.numOfNodes++;
    printf("num of nodes: %d\n", myFileList.numOfNodes);
}

I have added my code for the addFront function. It basically adds the details to a struct myFileList which is basically an implementation of a linked list. The FILENODE represents each entry in the list.

EDIT:

Adding the structs I am using

 struct fileNode
 {
      char fileName[50];
      char fileSize[50];
          char ownerName[25];
      struct fileNode* next;
 };

 struct fileList
 {
      struct fileNode* head;
      struct fileNode* tail;
       int numOfNodes;
 };

 typedef struct fileList FILELIST;
 typedef struct fileNode FILENODE;
share|improve this question
3  
What does addFront do? BTW: when you do strcat(tempFilePath, "SharedFiles/"); tempFilePath is not initialised. The may or may not be a \0 in there somewhere. –  wildplasser Nov 26 '12 at 0:13
    
BTW: you should avoid strcat as much as possible. My advise is to combine the two strcat() calls into one ret = snprintf(tempFilePath, sizeof tempFilePath,"%s/%s", "SharedFiles", tempFileName); call. –  wildplasser Nov 26 '12 at 0:28
    
Your strcat is indeed bad. But there's no language-level reason your code can crash on those memsets. If it really does, the only possibility I see is that addFront somehow destroyed the program stack structure, still allowing it to successfully return to your function, but causing it to crash on the first memset. –  AndreyT Nov 26 '12 at 0:46
    
How about the uninitialised tempFilePath + the subsequent strcat() ? Damage may already have been done even before the mysterious addFront() is called. –  wildplasser Nov 26 '12 at 0:47
    
Thanks for all your comments/inputs. The tempFilePath seems to be working fine since I tested by printing it out before passing it to the stat() call. Since the stat() call works fine, I guess tempFilePath, atleast at that point, seems to be okay. But I will make sure I change it to avoid the problems that all of you have mentioned regarding using strcat on uninitialized variable. –  FieryDragon87 Nov 26 '12 at 0:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know why your program would crash there. But I can another error in the program. Fix the other error first, see if you still have problems.

This is wrong:

strcat(tempFilePath, "SharedFiles/");
strcat(tempFilePath, tempFileName);

The tempFilePath variable is uninitialized. This may coincidentally not crash, but you cannot rely on it not to crash. It may scribble on your stack.

Do this instead:

snprintf(tempFilePath, sizeof(tempFilePath), "SharedFiles/%s", tempFileName);

Finally, there is no need to zero the arrays. The contents of the arrays are not used in the next loop iteration, so you might as well ignore them.

void extractFileData(FILE *fp , char clientName[])
{
    char tempFileName[50], tempFilePath[100], *newLinePos;
    struct stat fileDetails;
    while (fgets(tempFileName, sizeof(tempFileName), fp)) {
        if ((newLinePos = strchr(tempFileName, '\n')))
            *newLinePos = '\0';
        snprintf(tempFilePath, sizeof(tempFilePath),
                 "SharedFiles/%s", tempFileName);
        if (stat(tempFilePath, &fileDetails) < 0) {
            perror("Stat error");
            exit(1);
        }
        printf("temp file size: %zu\n", tempFileSize);
        addFront(tempFileName, tempFileSize, clientName);
    }
}   

The snprintf() function is really the number one choice for doing work like this in C. It's easy to write code with snprintf() that "obviously won't crash", as opposed to code that "won't obviously crash".

If your code still crashes, there is an error somewhere else.

share|improve this answer
    
I will implement that and get back to you. –  FieryDragon87 Nov 26 '12 at 1:03
    
You may want to check the return value from snprintf(). It is not crucial, but it might help. –  wildplasser Nov 26 '12 at 1:06
    
I changed my code to use snprintf instead of strcat like you suggested. I still have the same segmentation fault. @wildplasser Did that also. It is fine –  FieryDragon87 Nov 26 '12 at 1:10
    
@Since I replaced the strcat with snprintf like Dietric Epp said, I don't actually need to zero the arrays since the values will get overwritten. So right now I have solved the problem by removing the memset statements and everything works as expected. But I still can't understand why memset gives me a seg fault at that point. –  FieryDragon87 Nov 26 '12 at 1:15
    
Well, actually my snprintf() suggestion came first. WRT memset(): that is the secret of undefined behaviour, anything can happen. At any moment. It is like the Spanish inquisition! –  wildplasser Nov 26 '12 at 1:18

addFront() needs a n = malloc( sizeof *n) before you do anything with it.

share|improve this answer
    
Plus: the pointers inside the structure need to be set to a usable value, too. (I don't even know if it are pointers, it is a very secret struct, somehow) –  wildplasser Nov 26 '12 at 1:19
    
@wildplasser: great point, the assignment is using addresses on the stack that are useless once the function returns. –  tomlogic Nov 26 '12 at 1:22
    
@tomlogic will do so –  FieryDragon87 Nov 26 '12 at 1:31
    
@wildplasser there is nothing secret about the structs I am using. I just did not want to add extra information which may not be useful for solving the problem. –  FieryDragon87 Nov 26 '12 at 1:31
    
So, it are arrays inside the struct. (but there is no struct involved, only an uninitialised pointer to a non-existing struct) –  wildplasser Nov 26 '12 at 1:35

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