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I have a bunch of printf()s that correctly print a quite complex string that I have to build.

The problem is that I need to store that string in a variable (the result of all those printf()s together for sending them via a socket. I'm quite sure I need them to be sent at once - but I'll let a small window open if you want to convince me that's not true.

What's the best way to achieve that?

The string length is REALLY variable. I've heard of sprintf() and realloc(), and even asprintf(), but I can't just see how to mix all these together.

Here's my current code:

void mostrarVariable(char *variable, void *valor) {
    printf("%s=%d\n", variable, *(int *)valor);
}

void mostrarEntradaStack(t_registro_stack *entradaStack) {
    printf("%d,%s\n", entradaStack->retorno, entradaStack->nombre_funcion);
}

void suspender(t_pcb *pcb) {
    char *mensaje = NULL;
    mensaje = strdup("1Proceso suspendido...");
    // FIXME: guardar los printf en una variable y enviarlo por la red

    printf("----------------\n\n");
    printf("ID=%d\n", pcb->id_proceso);
    printf("PC=%d\n", pcb->program_counter);
    printf("\n-- Estructura de codigo --\n");

    int indice = 0;

    // believe me: this iterates a char** printf-ing each line
    while(pcb->codigo[indice] != NULL) {
        printf("%s\n", pcb->codigo[indice++]);
    }

    printf("----------------\n");
    printf("\n-- Estructuras de datos --\n");

    // believe me: this calls mostrarVariable() for each entry in the pcb->datos dictionary
    dictionary_iterator(pcb->datos, mostrarVariable);

    printf("----------------\n\n");
    printf("-- Estructura de Stack --\n");

    // believe me: this calls mostrarEntradaStack() for each element in the stack without modifying it
    pila_hacer(pcb->stack, mostrarEntradaStack);

    printf("\n----------------\n");

    // believe me: this sends "mensaje" via a socket ("pcb->id_proceso"), and it handles the partial send()s and all of that
   // it has to be on one socket_send() to correctly send the message length to the other endpoint - the protocol pretty works
    socket_send(pcb->id_proceso, mensaje, strlen(mensaje) + 1);
}

Trust me, code currently works, but as mensaje just has the value "1Proceso suspendido...", data is printed locally instead of being sent to the remote.

Sample output:

----------------

ID=4
PC=6

-- Estructura de codigo --
#!/home/desert69/workspaces/operativos/no-quiero/procer/pi/build/pi
# Comentario
variables a,b,c,d,e
comienzo_programa
a=1
b=2;3
c=a+b
d=c-3
f1()
f2()
e=a+c;2
imprimir a
imprimir b
imprimir c
imprimir d
imprimir e
fin_programa
comienzo_funcion f1
a=3
f3()
b=4
fin_funcion f1
comienzo_funcion f2
a=a+1
fin_funcion f2
comienzo_funcion f3
c=d
fin_funcion f3
----------------

-- Estructuras de datos --
c=159769736
d=159769776
a=159769600
b=159769696
e=159769816
----------------

-- Estructura de Stack --

----------------

Sorry for the code in Spanish, but I wanted to be sure it's the exact same thing I'm running. Maybe later (if I can) I'll try to translate it, but I'm not sure. Even tough, the important thing is to replace every printf() to something for appending those outputs to mensaje.

Feel free to comment if you need any further info.

Thanks. Really :)

share|improve this question
    
I've already solved this issue, but SO won't let me accept my own answer until 2 days later. See stackoverflow.com/a/13560429/641451 for my solution. –  mgarciaisaia Nov 26 '12 at 7:30

4 Answers 4

The easiest way to do this is to concatenate a bunch of sprintf statements. Ignoring error conditions, the statement returns the number of characters written. So you can basically do this:

char *bufptr = buffer;
bufptr += sprintf( bufptr, "ID=%d\n", pcb->id_proceso );
bufptr += sprintf( bufptr, "PC=%d\n", pcb->program_counter );

etc

Then buffer contains the string built from successive calls to sprintf. Obviously you need to ensure the buffer is large enough. You also should handle errors if you anticipate any.

In addition, you get the final length of the string using bufptr - buffer, which is useful to know if you're sending this through a socket.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 this is a simple and straight-forward approach to the problem. If needed you can realloc as you approach a defined thresh-hold from end-of-buffer and reposition buffptr within the realloc'ed base. Nice approach. –  WhozCraig Nov 26 '12 at 1:23
    
this will likely segfault if sprintf() returns error (as a negative number) –  lenik Nov 26 '12 at 1:41
    
That's corret, @lenik. I mentioned that error handling is a good idea. In practice, I cannot think how sprintf could possibly return an error on these simple strings. –  paddy Nov 26 '12 at 2:06
    
@paddy yeah, I know - it's kinda what I typed - but the main problem is how to ensure buffer is big enough. I'm writing something like a script interpreter of a minimalistic scripting language (college assignment, yeah), so the pcb->code, for example, can vary between a few bytes to thousands of them. The real problem is what's the best way to ensure buffer is long enough... –  mgarciaisaia Nov 26 '12 at 5:14
    
Well, you would keep track of your buffer size and use snprintf to ensure you didn't overrun, then realloc when necessary. Honestly though, you want to start with a buffer size that is going to handle just about anything you might throw at it. You don't want to be reallocating your buffer too often. As for your solution, it's extremely inefficient. Using strlen to calculate the buffer size is just plain wrong. You are constantly reallocating even when you most likely don't need to, because you're not keeping track of the true buffer size. –  paddy Dec 6 '12 at 2:55

you may create a large buffer and sprintf() all your data into that buffer.

char buffer[20000];    // large enough
char str[500];         // temporary string holder

buffer[0] = '\0';      // clean up the buffer
sprintf( str, "----------------\n\n");            strcat( buffer, str);
sprintf( str, "ID=%d\n", pcb->id_proceso);        strcat( buffer, str);
sprintf( str, "PC=%d\n", pcb->program_counter);   strcat( buffer, str);
sprintf( str, "\n-- Estructura de codigo --\n");  strcat( buffer, str);

... and so on

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't done the math, but I have no way to assure 20k is "large enough" for me. And that's the real problem. –  mgarciaisaia Nov 26 '12 at 5:17
    
you may allocate 60k or 100k or several megabytes if necessary, why not? –  lenik Nov 26 '12 at 5:28
    
because I'm really not sure how big is big enough, and I don't feel like wasting gigs of memory for this, too. Besides, it can't be that hard enough. It's C, I know, but if I'd die trying to concatenate a couple of strings... –  mgarciaisaia Nov 26 '12 at 5:34

Looks pretty trivial at first glance. At each step you're appending either a string or an int. The former can be reduced to the latter with

char tmp[100];
snprintf(tmp, sizeof tmp - 1, "%d", n);
append_string(tmp);  // pseudo-code

So all you need is a way to append a string to another string. This can be done with a combination of strlen, realloc, strcpy, or memcpy.

The bigger issue is that your dictionary_iterator and pila_hacer functions don't seem to let you pass any additional information to your callbacks. printf doesn't care because it can just use the global stdout, but if you want to have it append to a string, you'll probably need to use a global variable here, so your callbacks know where to append to.

share|improve this answer
    
dictionary_iterator and pila_hacer are nothing like a problem - let's assume I can modify them to handle an extra variable. My issue is what's the best way to combine those functions you mention to achieve this. I'd love to have some string_append(dest, source) function that handles all of this dirty memory managment issues. –  mgarciaisaia Nov 26 '12 at 5:16
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've finally created a string_concat() function that receives a original string, a format and a variable argument list, and applies a vsnprintf with the format and arguments, and appends that to the original string:

EDIT: OK, so my previous approach was buggy. There were problems with the va_list I think. Here's the new version:

/**
 * @NAME: string_append
 * @DESC: Agrega al primer string el segundo
 *
 * Ejemplo:
 * char *unaPalabra = "HOLA ";
 * char *otraPalabra = "PEPE";
 *
 * string_append(&unaPalabra, otraPalabra);
 *
 * => unaPalabra = "HOLA PEPE"
 */
void string_append(char** original, char* string_to_add) {
        *original = realloc(*original, strlen(*original) + strlen(string_to_add) + 1);
        strcat(*original, string_to_add);
}

/**
 * @NAME: string_concat
 * @DESC: Concatena al primer string el resultado de aplicar los parametros al
 * formato especificado
 *
 * Ejemplo:
 * char *saludo = "HOLA ";
 * char *nombre = "PEPE";
 *
 * string_concat(&saludo, "%s!", nombre);
 *
 * => saludo = "HOLA PEPE!"
 */
void string_concat(char **original, const char *format, ...) {
    size_t buffer_size = strlen(format) + 1;
    char *temporal = malloc(buffer_size);
    size_t message_length = 0;
    va_list arguments;
    va_start(arguments, format);
    while((message_length = vsnprintf(temporal, buffer_size, format, arguments)) > buffer_size - 1) {
        buffer_size *= 2;
        temporal = (char *) realloc(temporal, buffer_size);
    }
    va_end(arguments);
    temporal = (char *) realloc(temporal, message_length + 1);

    string_append(original, temporal);
}

string_append() is still leaking memory (due to the realloc()), I'll manage that latter, I hope.


BUGGY CODE STARTS HERE

/**
 * @NAME: string_append
 * @DESC: Appends the second string to the first
 *
 * Example:
 * char *aWord = "Hello, ";
 * char *anotherWord = "world!";
 *
 * string_append(&aWord, anotherWord);
 *
 * => aWord = "Hello, world!"
 */
void string_append(char** original, char* string_to_add) {
    *original = realloc(*original, strlen(*original) + strlen(string_to_add) + 1);
    strcat(*original, string_to_add);
}

/**
 * @NAME: string_concat
 * @DESC: Concatenates to the first string the result of applying the arguments to 
 * the specified format
 *
 * Example:
 * char *salute = "Hello";
 * char *name = "world";
 *
 * string_concat(&salute, ", %s!", name);
 *
 * => salute = "Hello, world!"
 */
void string_concat(char **original, const char *format, ...) {
    size_t buffer_size = strlen(format) + 1;
    char *temporal = malloc(buffer_size);
    size_t message_length = 0;
    va_list arguments;
    va_start(arguments, format);
    while((message_length = vsnprintf(temporal, buffer_size, format, arguments)) > buffer_size - 1) {
        buffer_size *= 2;
        temporal = (char *) realloc(temporal, buffer_size);
    }
    va_end(arguments);
    temporal = (char *) realloc(temporal, message_length + 1);

    string_append(original, temporal);
}

END OF BUGGY CODE

I was previously given string_append() from my assignature repository.

I think it has no memory leaks/issues, but haven't really tested it that much. But is working for me, at least with the example I've showed in the original question.

So here's the final version of the code I showed previously:

void suspender(t_pcb *pcb) {
    char *mensaje = NULL;
    mensaje = strdup("1Proceso suspendido...\n\n");

    string_concat(&mensaje, "----------------\n\n");
    string_concat(&mensaje, "ID=%d\n", pcb->id_proceso);
    string_concat(&mensaje, "PC=%d\n", pcb->program_counter);
    string_concat(&mensaje, "\n-- Estructura de codigo --\n");

    int indice = 0;

    while(pcb->codigo[indice] != NULL) {
        string_concat(&mensaje, "%s\n", pcb->codigo[indice++]);
    }

    string_concat(&mensaje, "----------------\n");
    string_concat(&mensaje, "\n-- Estructuras de datos --\n");

    // TODA la magia negra junta: inner functions!! (?!!?!?!)
    void mostrarVariableEnMensaje(char *variable, void *valor) {
        string_concat(&mensaje, "%s=%d\n", variable, *(int *)valor);
    }

    dictionary_iterator(pcb->datos, mostrarVariableEnMensaje);

    string_concat(&mensaje, "----------------\n\n");
    string_concat(&mensaje, "-- Estructura de Stack --\n");

    void mostrarEntradaStackEnMensaje(t_registro_stack *entradaStack) {
        string_concat(&mensaje, "%d,%s\n", entradaStack->retorno, entradaStack->nombre_funcion);
    }

    pila_hacer(pcb->stack, mostrarEntradaStackEnMensaje);

    string_concat(&mensaje, "\n----------------\n");


    socket_send(pcb->id_proceso, mensaje, strlen(mensaje) + 1);
    free(mensaje);
}
share|improve this answer
    
size_t buffer_size = strlen(format) + 1; char *temporal = malloc(buffer_size);this won't work, you should be more careful with allocations –  lenik Nov 27 '12 at 15:40
    
@lenik: why won't? See I'm using vsnprintf, so the output will be trimmed if it doesn't fit, and I'll then realloc it until it does. –  mgarciaisaia Nov 27 '12 at 15:45

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