Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to read data from an Arduino micro controller to my pc running Mac OS X via serial port with the C programming language and the GCC compiler.

The format of my data is A xxxx xxxx xxxx xxxx xxxx xxxx B, with A is the beginning of the data, B is the end of the data and between the sensor there are 4 space (" "). The xxxx data vary vary between 0-1023.

I am trying this code:

#include<stdio.h>   /* Standard input/output definitions */
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>  /* String function definitions */
#include<unistd.h>  /* UNIX standard function definitions */
#include<fcntl.h>   /* File control definitions */
#include<errno.h>   /* Error number definitions */
#include<termios.h> /* POSIX terminal control definitions */
#include<string.h> 
#include<unistd.h>

char *buf;
int fd; /* File descriptor for the port */
int i,n;
char *sensor1, *sensor2, *sensor3, *sensor4, *sensor5, *sensor6,*header, *footer;

int open_port(void)
{
    fd = open("/dev/tty.usbmodem1d11", O_RDWR | O_NOCTTY | O_NDELAY);      

if (fd == -1)     {
    perror("cannot open");
}
else 
    fcntl(fd, F_SETFL, 0);
struct termios options;
tcgetattr(fd, &options);
cfsetispeed(&options, B9600);
cfsetospeed(&options, B9600);
options.c_cflag |= (CLOCAL | CREAD);
tcsetattr(fd, TCSANOW, &options);
options.c_cflag &= ~CSIZE; 
options.c_cflag &= ~PARENB;
options.c_cflag &= ~CSTOPB;
options.c_cflag &= ~CSIZE;
options.c_cflag |= CS8;
//    options.c_cflag |= (IXON | IXOFF | IXANY); // xon & xoff on
return (fd);
}

int main(int argc, char**argv) {
    buf=malloc(4095);
    open_port();
    free(buf);
    while(1){ 
        read(fd,buf,90);          
         printf("%s\n",buf);  
    }
    close(fd);
}

But the result is not consistent, I mean the length of the data is not the same:

A 1023 1023 1023 1023 1023 B

A

10233 023 1023 1023 B

A 1023 1023 1023 1023 1023 B

A 3 023 1023 1023 B

A 1023 1023 1023 1023 1023 B

A

10233 023 1023 1023 B

A 1023 1023 1023 1023 1023 BA

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
1  
Ccheck the return value from read(). read may return before it has obtained the number of bytes you intended to read. –  wildplasser Nov 26 '12 at 1:44
    
Also, don't assume the contents of buffer are nul-terminated; you cannot just call printf("%s", buffer); with the resulting buffer, printf()s "%s" expects a nul-terminated string. –  wildplasser Nov 26 '12 at 1:56
    
why do you free the buffer before using it? That is not what it causing your problem, but it wont help later on... –  William Morris Nov 26 '12 at 1:59
    
Also, try reading more than 90 bytes - eg read 1024. I have a feeling your reading is not keeping up with the data stream. What is your plaform? –  William Morris Nov 26 '12 at 2:02
    
I change the free buffer before close fd, but nothing change –  Limavolt Nov 26 '12 at 2:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Examine what you are getting back from each read call:

int nbytes;

while(1) { 
    nbytes = read(fd,buf,90);
    if( nbytes > 0 ) {
        buf[nbytes] = 0;
        printf( "Read %2d bytes: '%s'\n", nbytes, buf );
    }
}

You will need to gather the result into a buffer, and parse it according to your device's format specification. You can't just assume that each read call will give you a whole record.

To gather the result, you need to keep track of what you have already read - something like this...

int nbytes, nparsed;
int npos = 0;

while(1) { 
    nbytes = read(fd, &buf[npos], 90-npos);
    if( nbytes > 0 )
    {
        npos += nbytes;

        // Parse a line.  If successful, move remainder of line to
        // start of buffer and continue...
        nparsed = parse_line(buf, npos);
        if( nparsed > 0 ) {
            memmove( buf, &buf[npos], npos-nparsed );
            npos -= nparsed;
        }
    }
}

Depends on your application. It might be even simpler than that.

share|improve this answer
    
thank for the advise, the result look like this: Read 4 bytes 'A ' Read 4 bytes '1023' Read 4 bytes ' ' Read 4 bytes '1023' Read 4 bytes ' ' Read 4 bytes '1023' Read 4 bytes ' ' Read 3 bytes '0 ' Read 4 bytes ' 10' Read 4 bytes '23 ' Read 4 bytes ' 0 ' Read 4 bytes ' ' Read 4 bytes ' B ' still do not stable –  Limavolt Nov 26 '12 at 2:51
    
the result is for the first program. for the second program, I still looking for header for command parse_line –  Limavolt Nov 26 '12 at 3:05
1  
parse_line was an example of a function that you might write to handle the line. I don't know the details of how you would interpret data from your device, so I just put in something generic to illustrate how to collect data from a port and then use it. –  paddy Nov 26 '12 at 3:08
    
if I change with other program, like I send 0 than the micro send data from analog 0, and so on.. I use : open_port(); write(fd,"0",1); read(fd,buf0,10); printf(" %s \n",buf0); usleep(100); write(fd,"1",1); read(fd,buf1,10); printf(" %s \n",buf1); usleep(100);} but there are no result in the monitor. –  Limavolt Nov 26 '12 at 4:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.