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if I have a list of tuple like:

L=[(('a','b','c','d'),2),(('f','e','d','a'),3)]

I want to make a list that like:

L1=[['a','b','c','d'],['f','e','d','a']]

this is what I did:

L1=[]

for item in L:
    for(letter,integer) in item:
        L1.append(list(letter))
        print(L1)

but it comes up with error say that there are too many values to unpack

what's wrong with my code?

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1  
It shouldn't be a for loop; you just need letter, integer = item, I think. –  minitech Nov 26 '12 at 1:49
    
The elements in item are a list of characters and a number. You are trying to assign a 4-element list (the characters) to two variables... –  Felix Kling Nov 26 '12 at 1:50
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5 Answers 5

What's useful here is a list comprehension:

L1 = [list(letters) for (letters, number) in L]

This iterates over each pair in your list, taking the letters tuple of each pair and converting it to a list. It then stores each result as the element of a new list.

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+1 This is very readable, yet terse. –  tjameson Nov 26 '12 at 2:03
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You did:

 for item in L:
      for(letter,integer) in item:
          L1.append(list(letter))
          print(L1)

However, item is already a tuple and there's no need to iterate through it. What you want is

for letter, integer in L:
    L1.append(list(letter))

Or...

for item in L:
    letter, integer = item
    L1.append(list(letter))
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you may try:

L1 = [list(i[0]) for i in L]
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Your problem is in this line:

for(letter,integer) in item:

This will (try to) iterate over item, which is a 2-element tuple. Replace it by:

(letter,integer) = item

And it will work. There are more concise ways of doing that, of course, but this should get you started.

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There are several options to do that, one of them is to map your list by getting first element, eg. like this:

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> map(list, map(itemgetter(0), L))
[['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'], ['f', 'e', 'd', 'a']]

The other one is to use list comprehensions:

>>> [list(item[0]) for item in L]
[['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'], ['f', 'e', 'd', 'a']]

or lambda:

>>> map(lambda x: list(x[0]), L)
[['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'], ['f', 'e', 'd', 'a']]

But maybe you do not need a list and tuple will do. In such case the examples are simpler:

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> map(itemgetter(0), L)
[('a', 'b', 'c', 'd'), ('f', 'e', 'd', 'a')]
>>> [item[0] for item in L]
[('a', 'b', 'c', 'd'), ('f', 'e', 'd', 'a')]
>>> map(lambda x: x[0], L)
[('a', 'b', 'c', 'd'), ('f', 'e', 'd', 'a')]
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"There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it." –  JBernardo Nov 26 '12 at 1:59
    
@JBernardo: Your quote (basically the only content from your comment, in addition to quote characters) is well-known quote from Zen of Python (PEP20, as far as I remember), but it gives no feedback on my answer. Basically there are multiple ways to do it and different people prefer map(), others prefer comprehension. In this case it all depends on OP's code, which we do not know in full, so I leave this to OP to decide which one is better (I prefer map(), when using previously existing functions only, and comprehensions when I would have to use lambda). –  Tadeck Nov 26 '12 at 2:03
    
@JBernardo: About the choice: I think this simple case is just narrowed version of the problem OP is facing, so I have given multiple options. When it comes to the last part (using tuples anyway), it is expansion of basic answer in the case, when OP actually does not need to convert every tuple to list - and this is very often the case when it will be just iterated, not passed further for modification (like appending new values). Anyway, it is up to OP to choose better option. –  Tadeck Nov 26 '12 at 2:06
1  
Everytime someone uses map, Guido Van Rossum cries –  juliomalegria Nov 26 '12 at 4:37
    
@julio.alegria: ;) I disagree, he created map(), he left it in Python 3.x (as opposed to reduce()), and it is often very useful (shortens the code, makes it clearer). I consider map(sth, L) to be a lot clearer than [sth(i) for i in L] or, in Python 3.x rather (but not exactly): (sth(i) for i in L). map() has its place (as does eg. operator.itemgetter). –  Tadeck Nov 26 '12 at 4:55
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