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I am writing a function to list 'M' number of the prime numbers above a certain starting value 'N.' At this point I would simply like to make the function as efficient as possible(i.e: FAST!). I am out of ideas really so any help will be greatly appreciated. The code(matlab) follows:

function PrimeNumbersList = primes_after(N,M)
tic;
x = N;
s = 1;
PrimeNumbersList = 0;
if mod(N,2) == 0
while numel(PrimeNumbersList) < M

if isprime(x) == 1
    PrimeNumbersList(s) = x;
    x=x+2;
    s=s+1;
else
    x=x+2;
end
end
else
while numel(PrimeNumbersList) < M

if isprime(x) == 1
    PrimeNumbersList(s) = x;
    x=x+1;
    s=s+1;
else
    x=x+1;
end 
end
end
tElapsed=toc
end
share|improve this question
1  
What language is this written in? – Jon Nov 26 '12 at 2:13
    
How accurate does it have to be? Can you accept Carmichael numbers? And how is isprime implemented? – tjameson Nov 26 '12 at 2:17
    
I am using matlab 2012, accuracy is important but not the biggest priority here. What do you mean by Carmichael numbers. isprime checks each value to see if it is actually prime. – user1825494 Nov 26 '12 at 2:27
    
Carmichael numbers are fake primes that confuse Fermat's Little Theorem, a quick prime number validator. Since you're using matlab, you probably don't want to implement it yourself. – tjameson Nov 26 '12 at 2:42

There are a few potential speed increases here.

function PrimeNumbersList = primes_after(N,M)
tic;

x = 0;
if (N mod 2) == 0 && N != 2
    x = N + 1;
else
    x = N;
end

s = 1;
PrimeNumbersList = 0;
tempInt = x - 1;
isPrime = 1;

while numel(PrimeNumbersList) < M

    while tempInt > 1 && isPrime
        if (x mod tempInt) == 0
            isPrime = 0;
        end
        tempInt=tempInt-1;
    end

    if isPrime
        PrimeNumbersList(s) = x;
        x=x+1;
        s=s+1;
    else
        x=x+1;
    end

end
tElapsed=toc
end

OK, now for the explanation:

First, I check to see if N is an even number. If so, I increment 1 just to make sure it's odd (Not necessarily prime though). I do take the integer 2 into account, as it is prime, but is divisible by 2.

Since I don't know the speed of isPrime(), I just wrote my own (based on a simple proof of prime numbers). Feel free to check it with your tic/toc.

Other than that, there's not much more speed increase that I can see. My 2 cents.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the 2 insight, forgot about that. – tjameson Nov 26 '12 at 2:53
    
Thank you for that contribution. The N input will be on the order of 1000 so it being 2 will not be an issue. – user1825494 Nov 26 '12 at 2:56
    
@user1825494, it's always good to assume the user can input anything. – Jon Nov 26 '12 at 2:58
    
running your suggestion I get "Error using mod Too many input arguments." I am not sure why that is happening. Outside of that the fundamental idea behind abandoning the built in function 'isprime' seems like a possibly helpful route. – user1825494 Nov 26 '12 at 2:58
    
Error line? There's 2 mod statements in here, and neither of them are jumping out as being faulty. Perhaps we need a good round of parentheses. – Jon Nov 26 '12 at 3:01

One thing you can do is only consider odd numbers (increment by 2 instead of 1). This will cut the number of loop iterations in half.

There are likely gains to be had in isprime, depending on how it's implemented. It all depends on how accurate you need it to be (i.e. are Carmichael numbers allowed?).

Edit:

Your edits didn't really fix anything. Try this instead:

function PrimeNumbersList = primes_after(N,M)
    tic;
    x = N;
    s = 1;
    PrimeNumbersList = 0;

    if mod(x,2) == 0
        if x == 2
            PrimeNumbersList(s) = x;
            s=s+1;
        end
        x=x+1;
    end

    while numel(PrimeNumbersList) < M
        if isprime(x) == 1
            PrimeNumbersList(s) = x;
            s=s+1;
        end
        x=x+2;
    end

    tElapsed=toc
end

Also, you can probably change numel(PrimeNumberList) < M to s < m and avoid a function call. Minor optimization, but hey, we're already splitting hairs.

Edit:

If you cannot accept errors (e.g. Carmichael numbers), then you're stuck with the slow implementation of isprime (asuming it is correct). This is because checking whether a number is prime is difficult. Fermats Little Theorem is a clever shortcut, butisprime` probably uses that anyway with additional validation to eliminate error.

There really isn't much else you can do. If you're willing to rewrite this in a different language, then I'd recommend Haskell; it's got great support for generating numbers and will turn your code into about a 3 line function (or so).

I don't know matlab well enough to eliminate a few extra cycles, but here are some more suggestions:

  • If matlab can append to PrimeNumbersList, do that instead of setting an index. This may be faster (it is in Javascript)
    • This will get rid of the s variable, thus eliminating an addition
  • Use s instead of numel (try this instead of the above attempt)
share|improve this answer
    
I took even/odd into account but the initial 'N' input can be even or odd so the code is reposted above. – user1825494 Nov 26 '12 at 2:35
    
Your edit duplicated a ton of code and is still incorrect. Also, please don't ninja-edit the code in question to fix errors that are part of the problem. – tjameson Nov 26 '12 at 2:43
    
What about the integer 2? – Jon Nov 26 '12 at 2:48
    
@user1825494 - Please see updated answer. – tjameson Nov 26 '12 at 2:48
    
@Jon - What do you mean? Ninja-edited =) – tjameson Nov 26 '12 at 2:50

Do not iterate through a set of numbers testing each for primality. That will be impossibly slow. The algorithm you are looking for is called the Segmented Sieve of Eratosthenes.

Though the Sieve of Eratosthenes is very fast, it requires O(n) space. That can be reduced to O(sqrt(n)) for the sieving primes plus O(1) for the bitarray by performing the sieving in successive segments. At the first segment, the smallest multiple of each sieving prime that is within the segment is calculated, then multiples of the sieving prime are marked composite in the normal way; when all the sieving primes have been used, the remaining unmarked numbers in the segment are prime. Then, for the next segment, the smallest multiple of each sieving prime is the multiple that ended the sieving in the prior segment, and so the sieving continues until finished.

Consider the example of sieving from 100 to 200 in segments of 20; the 5 sieving primes are 3, 5, 7, 11 and 13. In the first segment from 100 to 120, the bitarray has 10 slots, with slot 0 corresponding to 101, slot k corresponding to 100 + 2k - 1, and slot 9 corresponds to 119. The smallest multiple of 3 in the segment is 105, corresponding to slot 2; slots 2+3=5 and 5+3=8 are also multiples of 3. The smallest multiple of 5 is 105 at slot 2, and slot 2+5=7 is also a multiple of 5. The smallest multiple of 7 is 105 at slot 2, and slot 2+7=9 is also a multiple of 7. And so on.

Function primes takes arguments lo, hi and delta; lo and hi must be even, with lo < hi, and lo must be greater than ceiling(sqrt(hi)). The segment size is twice delta. Array ps of length m contains the sieving primes less than sqrt(hi), with 2 removed, since even numbers are ignored, and array qs contains the offset into the sieve bitarray of the smallest multiple in the current segment of the corresponding sieving prime. After each segment, lo advances by twice delta, so the number corresponding to an index j of the sieve bitarray is lo + 2j + 1.

function primes(lo, hi, delta)
  sieve := makeArray(0..delta-1) # bitarray
  # calculate m and ps as described in text
  qs := makeArray(0..m-1) # least multiples
  for i from 0 to m-1
    qs[i] := (-1/2 * (lo + ps[i] + 1)) % ps[i]
  while lo < hi
    for i from 0 to delta-1
      sieve[i] := True
    for i from 0 to m-1
      for j from qs[i] to delta step ps[i]
        sieve[j] := False
      qs[i] := (qs[i] - delta) % ps[i]
    for i from 0 to delta-1
      t := lo + 2*j + 1
      if sieve[i] and t < hi
        output t
    lo := lo + 2*delta

For the sample given above, this is called as primes(100, 200, 10). In the example given above, qs is initially [2,2,2,10,8], corresponding to smallest multiples 105, 105, 105, 121 and 117, and is reset for the second segment to [1,2,6,0,11], corresponding to smallest multiples 123, 125, 133, 121 and 143. This algorithm is very fast; you should be able to generate several million primes in less than a second.

If you want to know more about programming with prime numbers, I modestly recommend this essay at my blog.

share|improve this answer
    
the OP wanted to calculate M primes above N, like 10000 primes above 100. Also, it isn't clear how m and ps (and hi) are to be calculated. – Will Ness Nov 27 '12 at 15:05
    
M and ps are calculated using a normal Sieve of Eratosthenes. I missed that the OP asked for N primes, not primes less than N, so there does have to be a calculation of hi. That can be done by the bounding formula for the number of primes, which says the nth prime is between n log n and n (log n + log log n). Then you stop sieving after finding the desired number of primes. That leaves you needing to calculate the number of primes less than lo. Not knowing the magnitudes involved makes this question hard to answer. – user448810 Nov 27 '12 at 16:30
    
will it work when sqrt(hi) > lo ? – Will Ness Nov 27 '12 at 17:17
    
Read it again. The fourth paragraph specifically states that lo must be greater than ceiling(sqrt(hi)). – user448810 Nov 27 '12 at 18:06
    
yes, missed that completely. to your previous comment: we don't need to know the number of primes below lo because OP wants to find specified number of primes above a given value. M primes above N, not above Nth prime. So that's easier. – Will Ness Nov 27 '12 at 18:08

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