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I am wanting to get the average of a column. I can get it working like:

           IEnumerable results = defaultView.Select(args);
           Decimal amount = results.Cast<Fees>().Average(x => x.Fee);

where results is a collection of System.Collections.Generic.List`1 objects. However results is not always the same object because something else may be returned.

It is always in the structure of x objects with 5-10 values each.

I was hoping for a generic way to iterate over the data such as results[0][2] but can't find a way to access this data without using the strongly typed example above. Any ideas?

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you could cast them to a dynamic, but why forgo the type safety? –  Jduv Nov 26 '12 at 2:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your best bet is to create interfaces for the properties that are shared amongst different classes:

public interface IHasFee
{
  decimal Fee {get;}
}

Then you could apply this interface to all the classes that have a Fee property:

public class Fees : IHasFee
{
  public decimal Fee {get;set;}
}


public class Charge : IHasFee
{
  public decimal Fee {get;set;}
}
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If you need to iterate through objects of certain type (for example Fees) in a collection that may contain objects of different types, try using: Enumerable.OfType Method .

IEnumerable results = defaultView.Select(args);
Decimal amount = results.OfType<Fees>().Average(x => x.Fee);

From MSDN:

Enumerable.OfType Method

Filters the elements of an IEnumerable based on a specified type.

The OfType(IEnumerable) method returns only those elements in source that can be cast to type TResult. To instead receive an exception if an element cannot be cast to type TResult, use Cast(IEnumerable).

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