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I'm trying to return the index with the smallest element in an array of integers. Am I missing something? After I put my integers in, it doesn't return the index.

UPDATE: I get an error at the end of int main() about the array stack being corrupted. Thank you. My code is as follows:

#include <iostream>
#include <conio.h>

using namespace std;

int indexofSmallestElement(double array[], int size);

int main()
{    
int size = 10; 
double array[10];

for (int i = 0; i <= size; i++)
{
    cout << "Enter an integer: " << endl;
    cin >> array[i];
}

indexofSmallestElement(array, size);
}

int indexofSmallestElement(double array[], int size)
{
int index = 0;

if (size != 1)
{

    int n = array[0];
    for (int i = 1; i < size; i++)
    {
        if (array[i] < n)
        {
            n = array[i];
            index = i;
        }
    }
}
return index;
}
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closed as too localized by djechlin, jogojapan, Mario, jigfox, Chris Nov 26 '12 at 16:10

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4  
Shouldn't it be n = array[0], not the other way around? Since you want to save the first number as your assumed smallest element, then compare from there. –  Clark Nov 26 '12 at 3:01
    
In addition to what @Clark said, also note that you discard the return value of indexofSmallestElement and don't display it. Also note that your loops use <= size which is incorrect - you should use < size. Remember, in C and C++ arrays start from 0, so if your array has 10 items, the valid indices are 0, 1, 2, ..., 9. Additionally, your index variable may be used uninitialized. Think of what happens when the smallest element is the first element. –  Nik Bougalis Nov 26 '12 at 3:06
    
Here is your stack corruption: for (int i = 0; i <= size; i++). Should be < –  Matthew Lundberg Nov 26 '12 at 3:47

3 Answers 3

A number of people have shown you their variant of indexofSmallestElement. I will include mine along with an explanation of why I think it's better:

int indexofSmallestElement(double array[], int size)
{
    int index = 0;

    for(int i = 1; i < size; i++)
    {
        if(array[i] < array[index])
            index = i;              
    }

    return index;
}

You will notice that I do away with the n variable, which you used to hold the smallest value encountered so far. I did this because, in my experience, having to keep two different things synchronized can be a source of subtle bugs. Even in this simple case, it was the source of multiple bugs, not the least of which was that your n was declared an int but you were assigning values of type double in it.

Bottom line: do away with the n variable and just keep track of one thing: the index.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for explanation. But the check for 1 is redundant - the loop condition will fail in the first instance if size=1. –  je4d Nov 26 '12 at 3:20
    
You are, of course, correct. I think that was a left-over from a copy-paste of the code. Fixed. –  Nik Bougalis Nov 26 '12 at 3:22
    
I had a new error that I put in my original post. I tried your way, but it didn't fix it. Is it just me? –  gosutag Nov 26 '12 at 3:31
    
As I explained in a comment to your original post, your "new" error is caused by this loop in main: for (int i = 0; i <= size; i++) Remember, in C and C++ arrays start from 0, so if your array has 10 items, the valid indices would be 0, 1, 2, ..., 9. Yet this loop will go from 0 to 10. In other words, you're trying to stuff 11 things in an array of 10 things. Your loop should be: for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) –  Nik Bougalis Nov 26 '12 at 3:38

It should be n = array[0] instead of array[0] = n. It means you are supposing firs element of the array to be the smallest in the beginning and then comparing it with others.

Moreover in your loop, you are exceeding the bound of your array. The for loop should run till i < size and not i <= size.

Your code should be like this..

int indexofSmallestElement(double array[], int size)
{
  int index = 0 ;
  double n = array[0] ;
  for (int i = 1; i < size; ++i)
  {
    if (array[i] < n)
    {
        n = array[i] ;
        index = i ;
    }
  }
 return index;
}
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inside the loop use array[i] and index = i. Size is the boundary :)

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