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I have an ivar like this declared on interface:

BOOL controllerOK;

I have to use this ivar inside a block that resides itself in a block. Something like

myBlockl = ^(){
  [self presentViewController:controller
    animated:YES
    completion:^(){
      if (controllerOK)
        [self doStuff];
      }];
};

If I try to do that, I see a warning:

capturing self strongly in this block is likely to lead to a retain cycle

for the if (controllerOK) line.

This does not appear to be one of those blocks problems that you create another variable using __unsafe_unretained before the block starts. First because this instruction cannot be used with a BOOL and second because the ivar controllerOK has to be tested on runtime inside the block. Another problem is that the block itself is declared on the interface, so it will be used outside the context where it is being created.

How do I solve that?

share|improve this question
    
The code quoted above is not real code. Voted to close. –  matt Nov 26 '12 at 4:54
    
@matt: why is it "not real code"? –  newacct Nov 26 '12 at 20:00
    
@newacct See my answer below: if you just copy and paste that code into an app (and implement the needed declarations etc.) there is no such error. So the question must not be showing what the code really is. –  matt Nov 26 '12 at 20:02
    
@matt: if myBlockl is an instance variable, then it does (and it's a warning, not an error) –  newacct Nov 26 '12 at 20:07
    
@newacct Ah. So that's what he meant by "the block itself is declared on the interface". You've solved it. –  matt Nov 26 '12 at 20:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should work:

__weak id this = self;
myBlockl = ^(){
  [self presentViewController:controller
    animated:YES
    completion:^(){
      if (this->controllerOK)
        [this doStuff];
      }];
};
share|improve this answer
    
But doesn't that initial reference to self generate a strong reference also? Also, when I try to compile this, I get an error "Member reference base type 'id' is not a structure or union". –  Rob Nov 26 '12 at 5:23
    
id should be replaced with the actual class name (and a pointer). I don't think the initial self is a problem. The cycle comes from the self references in the inner most block because those would be retained by a method being called by self. –  rmaddy Nov 26 '12 at 5:30
1  
how does this help? instead of capturing and retaining self, you are now capturing and retaining this, which points to the same object –  newacct Nov 26 '12 at 19:59
    
@newacct I forgot the __weak. Fixed. –  rmaddy Nov 26 '12 at 20:05
    
thanks!!!!!!!!! –  Desperate Developer Feb 9 '13 at 2:20

controllerOK implicitly compiles as self->controllerOK because it needs to access its memory location through self. Because of that, it is "one of those blocks problems", although in this case just a simple BOOL variable will do.

__weak typeof(self) weakSelf = self;
myBlockl = ^(){
    BOOL isControllerOK = controllerOK;
    [self presentViewController:controller animated:YES completion:^(){
        if (isControllerOK)
        {
            [weakSelf doStuff];
        }
    }];
};

I put _weak there because even if you fix the warning message for controllerOK, you'll get it again in [self doStuff]

share|improve this answer
    
This is wrong. controllerOK is self->controllerOK –  newacct Nov 26 '12 at 19:58
    
That is irrelevant since I am explaining the relationship between the iVar and self. Unlike the other answers here that just work through how to get it work I tried to explain why the warning exists. –  John Estropia Nov 27 '12 at 0:17
    
I am also talking about the relationship. You said "controllerOK implicitly compiles as self.controllerOK". That is factually incorrect. self.controllerOK is identical in the language to [self controllerOK]; whereas controllerOK is identical to self->controllerOK. –  newacct Nov 27 '12 at 1:50
    
Edited the dot notation to pointer notation. –  John Estropia Nov 27 '12 at 2:17
    
Okay. Another thing is that now you are now remembering the value of the isControllerOK at the time the block is created, rather than using the value at the time the block is run. Not sure whether there is a difference in this case, but in general, they are different. –  newacct Nov 27 '12 at 4:08

The problem may be that you are not in fact quoting your actual code. I tried your code and it compiled under ARC with no warning. But I had to modify it a little because your syntax for declaring a block is wrong. Thus you clearly did not copy and paste your actual code. It is a waste of time for people to try to help you if you don't show the real code that is giving trouble.

share|improve this answer

You need to replace references to your objects with weak references.

The typical fix is to declare a local variable:

__weak id weakSelf = self;

As rmaddy's observed, referring to an ivar, controllerOK, also generates a strong reference cycle. You can replace BOOL controllerOK ivar with an object:

NSNumber *controllerOK;

and then you can use a weak reference to that, such as in the following:

controllerOK = @YES;

__weak typeof(self) weakSelf = self;
__weak NSNumber *weakControllerOk = controllerOK;

myBlockl = ^(){
    [weakSelf presentViewController:controller
                           animated:YES
                         completion:^(){
                             if ([weakControllerOk boolValue])
                                 [weakSelf doStuff];
                         }];
};
share|improve this answer
    
no, the problem is controllerOK. I did what you said and the problem persists. Xcode is complaining about controllerOK. –  Desperate Developer Nov 26 '12 at 4:40
    
@DesperateDeveloper Did you replace both occurrences of self? The reason I ask is your error message explicitly references self... –  Rob Nov 26 '12 at 4:51
    
yes.................... –  Desperate Developer Nov 26 '12 at 4:58
    
You can't reference any ivars either. controllerOK is really self->controllerOK. See my answer. –  rmaddy Nov 26 '12 at 5:04
    
I resolved this issue by replacing BOOL controllerOK with NSNumber *controllerOK, which you can set as controllerOK = @YES, and then you can use a weak reference to that. –  Rob Nov 26 '12 at 5:12

can you try like this

myBlockl = ^(){

    [self presentViewController:controller
                       animated:YES
                     completion:^(BOOL isFinished){
                                if (isFinished == controllerOK)
                                      [self doStuff];
                                  }];
};

I am not very familiar about blocks but it worked for me.....

share|improve this answer
    
nope, the completion part is just ^(){ } –  Desperate Developer Nov 26 '12 at 4:44
    
thanks for editing....:) –  iOS_Developer Nov 26 '12 at 4:49

unfortunately the only solution that worked was to convert BOOL controllerOK to a property nonatomic, assign and then use it inside the block.

I have tested all solutions you have posted here, without success.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed. When I replaced the controllerOK with a nonatomic, it seems to work fine. –  Rob Nov 26 '12 at 5:27
    
no, you don't need a property –  newacct Nov 26 '12 at 20:03

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