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In the "wire up a backend" demo code from the angularjs site they set up a db call. From what I can tell they're extending the update function in order to add some extra parameters needed by the mongolab api.

angular.module('mongolab', ['ngResource']).
factory('Project', function($resource) {
  var Project = $resource('https://api.mongolab.com/api/1/databases' +
      '/angularjs/collections/projects/:id',
      { apiKey: '4f847ad3e4b08a2eed5f3b54' }, {
        update: { method: 'PUT' }
      }
  );

  Project.prototype.update = function(cb) {
    return Project.update({id: this._id.$oid},
        angular.extend({}, this, {_id:undefined}), cb);
  };

Then they call the update property like this:

$scope.save = function() {
$scope.project.update(function() {
  $location.path('/');
});

I've tried using this code to build a demo app using a local development server so I've omitted extending the update property as I don't need the extra $oid parameter. What I do need is to specify that the update method should use PUT. My code is like this:

var Unit = $resource('http:/localhost/api/unit/:id', {id:'@Unit_Id'},
{'update': { method: 'PUT' }}); 

And then calling it like this:

$scope.save = function () {
    $scope.unit.update(function () {
        $location.path('/unitlist');
    });

But What I've discovered is that the code only runs with a dollar sign in front of update like this:

    $scope.save = function () {
    $scope.unit.$update(function () {
        $location.path('/unitlist');
    });

So here are my questions:

  1. In the demo code, where is "update" actually added to the Project variable? As a parameter in $resource or using prototype to extend Project?
  2. Why is update undefined in my code unless I prefix $ when I call it?
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3 Answers

"In the demo code, where is "update" actually added to the Project variable? As a parameter in $resource or using prototype to extend Project?"

Adding the following code to end of the factory() method:

console.log('Project.update=' + Project.update)
console.log('Project.prototype.update=' + Project.prototype.update)
return Project;

we see that Project.update is a function, and that Project.prototype.update is another/different function. So there are actually two update functions. Function Project.update is a (non-GET) "class" action, so it is called without a $ prefix. update() is a function defined on the object returned by $resource -- i.e., Project. Indeed, we see that function Project.prototype.update calls Project.update(...).

In the EditCtrl, when data is returned from the server, the project variable is a resource "instance" object (which is different from the resource "class" object), hence it has (non-GET) "instance" actions, which are prefixed with $. One of those actions is $update. Add the following log() to the EditCtrl function to prove that project.$update() exists:

Project.get({id: $routeParams.projectId}, function(project) {
   console.log('project.$update=' + project.$update)

So now we have a third "update" function. However, in the demo code, they don't use this project.$update() function -- they use the function they defined on Project.prototype instead.

"Why is update undefined in my code unless I prefix $ when I call it?"

In your code, Unit.update should be defined (this is a resource "class" action), and when your data is returned from the server, then $scope.unit.$update becomes defined (this is a resource "instance" action). Unit is a class, $scope.unit is an instance.

In your code, you probably don't need to use Unit.update because I'm guessing you first Unit.get() your data, and then you assign the returned data to $scope.unit, and then you update it using the instance (not the class), hence you are updating with $scope.unit.$update() and not Unit.update(), which is the recommended approach.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, here it is from the docs

The action methods on the class object or instance object can be invoked with the following parameters: HTTP GET "class" actions: Resource.action([parameters], [success], [error]) non-GET "class" actions: Resource.action([parameters], postData, [success], [error]) non-GET instance actions: instance.$action([parameters], [success], [error])

So, when you when you extend the class (prototype), call it without the $ like normal, but when you add an action as a parameter of $resource prefix $.

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As far as I get it they extend the prototype with this piece of code:

Project.prototype.update = function(cb) {
  return Project.update({id: this._id.$oid}, angular.extend({}, this, {_id:undefined}), cb);
};

Then they create an instance of the Project in line 30 of the project.js

$scope.project = new Project(self.original);

And then they can perform an update by simply calling:

$scope.project.update(...)

If you got rid of extending the prototype of your service, you can't call $scope.unit.update because there exist no property of unit that is called update.

I hope it helps :)

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Yes sounds good, but in my code if I add update under $resource then I can call $scope.unit.$update(). In the demo code, what's the difference between the update added as a parameter of $resource and the updated added using prototype? –  panchoLopez Nov 26 '12 at 11:27
    
@panchoLopez To my best understanding, when you add it as a parameter of $resource, the internal code goes and defines that method in two places: Project.x (class method) and project.$x (instance method). Editing the prototype bypasses this and lets you add just the instance method, though you'll have to add the $ prefix on your own (or not). –  Prathan Thananart Apr 2 '13 at 1:29
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