Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the strangest error I have seen for a while in Python (version 3.0).

Changing the signature of the function affects whether super() works, despite the fact that it takes no arguments. Can you explain why this occurs?

Thanks,

Chris

>>> class tmp:
...     def __new__(*args):
...             super()
... 
>>> tmp()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in __new__
SystemError: super(): no arguments
>>> class tmp:
...     def __new__(mcl,*args):
...             super()
... 
>>> tmp()
>>>
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

As the docs say, "The zero argument form automatically searches the stack frame for the class (__class__) and the first argument." Your first example of __new__ doesn't HAVE a first argument - it claims it can be called with zero or more arguments, so argumentless super is stumped. Your second example DOES have an explicit first argument, so the search in the stack frame succeeds.

share|improve this answer
add comment

python 3.0 new super is trying to dynamically make a choice for you here, read this PEP here that should explain everything.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.